For These Summer Campers, It’s More Than Riding a Bike

first_imgBy Michele J. KuhnLINCROFT – Their faces told the story.Volunteers help one of the 40 campers participating in the Lose the Wheels Training Camp at Brookdale Community College.Wide smiles, grins, and the looks of sheer determination, concentration, and pride were everywhere as youngsters rode specially adapted bikes at Brookdale Com­munity College during the Lose the Training Wheels Bicycle Camp for children with challenges.“It’s a childhood rite of passage,” said Jane Kleiman. Bike riding “is something most of us take for granted … Now these kids can learn to ride, too.”The camp, held on the college campus Monday, Aug. 20 through Friday, Aug. 24, offered 40 people, ages 8 to 20, the chance to learn to ride a bike. It’s a skill some parents have found difficult to teach but, with the use of the special bicycles, the nonprofit Lose the Training Wheels organization says its weeklong camps have an 80 percent success rate.Kleiman, a Red Bank resident who coordinated the effort at Brookdale, has an 11-year-old son, Jackson Miller, who participated in the camp last year in Hoboken. Though he didn’t progress to a two-wheeler by the end of the session, Kleiman is hopeful he will this year.The program, Kleiman said, often leads to a boost in self-confidence that helps the young riders to believe they can learn other skills. “They try other things,” she said. “They say, ‘If I can do that, I can try this.’ ” The bike camp also gives students a chance to socialize, improve their physical fitness, gain some independence, and interact with volunteers who quickly become their cheerleaders.Those who attend the camp have a variety of disabilities, including autism, Down syndrome, and ADHD. The participants need to be able to walk and step to the side to take part.An important part of the camp is the bikes that are used by Lose the Training Wheels. Developed by Dr. Richard E. Klein and his students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the bikes have a regular front wheel but use a roller in the rear. The roller is cylindrical at the start. As the child’s skill and confidence improve, the rollers are progressively tapered, fatter in the middle and thinner at the ends, offering a more unstable ride that requires a certain amount of balance. There is also a handle at the back of the bike for volunteers to grab when riders begin to wobble too much. The roller bikes are used until the rider is comfortable enough to ride a two-wheeler – without training wheels. A tandem bike is also used for some of the young students.The children spend 75 minutes a day for five days learning the new skill. There were five sessions a day with eight students each and many volunteers assisting the riders.As one young man pedaled past a group of moms waiting on the bleachers and yelled “Hi, Mom!” it was hard to tell which mother was his because they were all smiling.“They love it,” said Michelle DePasquale of Edison whose sons Emilio, 9, and Anthony, 12, were learning to ride in the 8:30 a.m. class.For her boys, the class offered a confidence boost, an opportunity to focus on a fun task, and a chance to socialize. “It allows me to give them an avenue to go out and play like typical kids,” DePasquale said.She also liked the idea that bike riding is a three-season sport and that the skill is being taught by volunteers who were instructed how to help by the Lose the Training Wheels program.“To have others working with them is great. It allows the volunteers to tell them things that I can but that they won’t listen to because I’m the mom. [The volunteers] tell them things and they listen to them,’’ she said.Lynda Mazzella of Howell said having her 14-year-old daughter Courtney learn to ride a bike was on her list of things for Courtney to accomplish. “I was sad when kids in the neighborhood were out riding bikes and she wasn’t,” Mazzella said.Courtney, whose fine-motor skills are poor, was gaining strength during her camp sessions and was happily pedaling around the gym.“This is a confidence and self-esteem builder,” said Mazzella, who has made sure her daughter has been introduced to many skills, sports, and experiences. “I don’t want her to fear things.”Volunteers at the Lose the Training Wheels Camp at Brookdale Community College assist a youngster learn how to ride a bike.Linda Argiro of Belford was pleased with the progress her son, Vincent, 19, was making. She hopes bike riding will be added to his set of activities to help him stay fit and avoid the heart problems which have been part of their family’s history.Lose the Training Wheels was begun in 1991 in Canada, according to Andrea Patrick, floor supervisor for the nonprofit organization. Last summer, 86 camps were held in the United States and Canada.Patrick, who has been with the program the past three summers, has seen exciting results. “It affects the riders, their families, everyone,” she said. “Last week we heard of a rider who asked his father to teach him how to cast a line and fish because he had learned to ride a bike and wanted to try something else.”During the first day of the Brookdale camp, Kleiman said she saw what the program can mean to young riders and their families. As one camper was riding around the gym, she heard one of his siblings, a 7-year-old, say, “Hey, Mom, he looks like a different kid out there!”Kleiman’s wish for her son Jackson at the end of the week is that he develops the skill to ride with his family, including 4-year-old sister Mina, on the bike paths of Sandy Hook to visit his favorite lighthouse.last_img read more

Natural Gas Regulator Station Proposal Raises Real Estate Concerns

first_imgBy Vincent Ferrer |HOMDEL – The Zoning Board met Wednesday, Oct. 10 at Holmdel’s Town Hall to hear from experts and residents on a controversial utilities development project.Following a failed application nearly two years ago, New Jersey Natural Gas (NJNG) has applied to the Zoning Board for 12 variances to permit a natural gas regulator station at 960 Holmdel Road in the southern part of the township. The station – a 16.51-acre site owned by Holmdel Venture LLC – is currently zoned for office/laboratory use, but more concerning to Holmdel residents is the proximity to residential homes, offices, preserved farmland and the nearby Village School.The greatest point of contention came after a real estate valuation expert for NJNG testified that the station would have no impact on local real estate values. The expert drew this conclusion from a study that observed the impact of similar stations built in Colts Neck, Lincroft, Wall Township, Aberdeen, and Morris County.Residents took issue with the real estate study, which excluded any quantitative effect on more than 400 acres of nearby farmland. The study was limited to “dominant land uses” – specifically residential uses, building lots and office space – and disregarded land encumbered by use restrictions.Anthony Sposaro, Esq., who appeared on behalf of the Casola family and Fox Hollow Vineyards in Holmdel, along with a dozen other residents, voiced their concerns over the study’s accuracy. NJNG was represented by Nancy Skidmore of Connell Foley LLP.Board member Chris Briamonte called attention to the fact the highest valued homes sold in the study were neither in close proximity to a station nor over $1 million. A recently constructed housing development in Holmdel containing several homes valued in excess of $1 million is located near where the station will potentially exist.Briamonte cited a correlation in the study between pricing and proximity to a station. “In most cases, as I get closer to your station, my price gets significantly lower,” he said. Board chairperson Valerie Avrin-Marchiano asked for NJNG to supply the data used in creating the study.Richard Reading, a Princeton-based economic consultant who also appeared on behalf of NJNG, testified that the new station would only cost the town an additional $5 per year.Opponents of the construction say the proposed regulator station is unnecessary given Holmdel’s population and a lack of substantial power outages. Yet NJNG argues the current and future needs of the utilities network, to which Holmdel is just one part, call for an upgraded station.The Holmdel Zoning Board will be voting next month on whether or not to grant the variances.This article was first published in the Oct. 18-24, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Quick starting Baker foils L.V. Rogers 54-46

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsThe Mount Baker Wild jumped out to a 21-11 first quarter lead en route to a 54-46 victory over the L.V. Rogers Bombers in Kootenay High School Boy’s Basketball action Tuesday at the Hangar in Nelson.Scott Watinoogh led the charge for the Wild with 10 of the 21 points. LVR rallied back in the second quarter, out scoring the Wild 13-12 but Baker increased its margin to 45-31 after three periods and never looked back.Mike Hamm led the Wild with 22 points while Watinoogh added 15. Leading the Bomber attack was John Zak with 15 while Jason D’Andrea had 11. Jesse Zak had seven and Clay Rickaby chipped in with six.The Bombers now travel to Vernon Thursday to play in the Clarence Fulton Maroons Invitational Tournament.The tourney is loaded with top caliber AA teams in the province, including second ranked South Okanagan Hornets from Oliver.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

Saints close out exhibition campaign perfect after 6-1 blasting of Eastern Washington

first_imgIf this keeps up college staff may want to reserve the marching band for the victory celebrations.The Selkirk Saints closed out the preseason Sunday undefeated after stopping Eastern Washington Eagles 6-1 in B.C. Intercollegiate Hockey League action at the Castlegar Complex. The Saints dominated possession and established a 21-6 advantage in shots on goal, but only managed to put one puck past Eagles netminder Cash Ulrich during the opening period.Second-year forward Nick Cecconi was the goal scorer, with Jordan Wood and Justin Sotkowy adding assists. Selkirk extended its lead in the second period with a pair of shorthanded goals, as Logan Proulx and Dylan Smith each took advantage of neutral zone breakdowns and converted on breakaway opportunities.Former Spokane Braves forward Uriah Machuga put Eastern Washington on the board with 2:49 remaining in the frame, but Wood quickly restored his team’s three-goal advantage just 12 seconds later.Linemates Thomas Hardy and Cole Thomson rounded out the scoring for the Saints in the third period, as the home side finished the game with a 53-26 advantage in shots. “Getting pucks and traffic to the net has been a focus over the past two weeks, and we followed through with a good performance in the offensive zone,” said Saints head coach Jeff Dubois.”Certain parts of our game are still a work in progress, but we’ve experienced some success in our exhibition games and we’re focused on carrying that momentum forward into the start of the regular season next weekend.” Alex Sirard and Stephen Wolff split duties in the Saints’ net on Sunday, with Sirard earning the win in his first preseason appearance. He stopped all 14 shots he faced in 30 minutes of action before Wolff allowed one goal on 12 shots over the game’s second half. Selkirk now travels to Vancouver Island to open its regular season with a games against the University of Victoria next Friday and Saturday.The Saints’ home opener is set for Friday, September 12th against Trinity Western University from Langley, B.C.last_img read more

Miller shoots down Hawks in overtime sparking Nelson to 5-4 victory

first_imgJust when fans are ready to write the eulogy for the Nelson Leafs the hockey club finds a way to come off life support.Rayce Miller scored an unassisted marker in overtime to lift the Leafs to a 5-4 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League victory over Beaver Valley Saturday night at the Hawks’ Nest.The win evens the Murdoch Division Semi Final a 1-1.Game three of the best-of-seven series is scheduled back in Nelson at the NDCC Arena Monday.Game four of the series goes Tuesday in Nelson.Both games have a 7 p.m. puck drop.The series shifts back to Fruitvale for Game five Thursday.After failing to solve Hawks’ netminder Drake Poirier in a 5-0 loss Friday during the opening game of the series, Nelson scored three times in the first period Saturday to take a 3-2 advantage into intermission.Tyler Fyfe and Michael Crawford with a pair put the visitors into the lead.Crawford then scored his third goal of the game in the second period to increase Nelson’s lead to 4-2.However, in the third Beaver Valley turned up the heat on the Leafs, out shooting the Green and White 22-15 in the frame.Reid Anderson cut the advantage to 4-3 with a goal four minutes into the period before Spencer McLean tied the game with 1:26 remaining in the third period. But the Hawks could not put any more pucks behind surprise goalie starter Jason Mailhoit.The Kootenay Ice backstopper faced 58 shots and was named the Leafs’ game star.Kyle Hope, Hawks’ game star, and Spencer McLean also scored for Beaver Valley, which out shot the Leafs 58-45.Both teams played without key players Saturday.Nelson’s Darnel St. Pierre was suspended for two games for an accumulation of checking-to-the-head penalties.Meanwhile, Jace Weegar was ticketed for three games after receiving a major penalty — checking-to-the-head — and game miscondut in last 10 minutes of game Friday’s game.Braves steal game two against Rebels, series tied 1-1In Castlegar, a second period goal by Paxton Malone, proved to be the winner as Spokane Braves posted a 6-3 road upset win over the Rebels to even the Murdoch Division Semi Final at 1-1.Castlegar won the opener Friday 4-3.Tyler Wilkerson, Tanner Stolz, Keith Anderson, Lance Nooman and Kyle Davis also scored for Spokane, which led 4-3 after 40 minutes.Yanis Wilkie, Cal Owens and Jeremy McNeil replied for Castlegar.Spokane out shot the Rebels 33-31 to make a winner out of netminder Trevor Dilauro.Patrick Zubick took the loss in goal for Castlegar.Game three and four are schedule for Monday and Tuesday in Spokane.The series shifts back to the Sunflower City for Game five Thursday.last_img read more

Nitros snap long drought by capturing KIJHL Championship

first_imgThe top song of 1979 was My Sharona by The Knack.That same year the Montreal Canadiens won the Stanley Cup and the Boston Bruins retired Bobby Orr’s Number “4”.That was also the last time the Kimberley Dynamiters won the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League Championship.The Nitros snapped the 36-year drought by ousting the Kamloops Storm 4-2 in the best-of-seven KIJHL Final Sunday in Spoolmak Country.Four players each had two points to spark the Dynamiters to a 5-1 series-clinching win.The victory came on the heels of a thrilling 3-2 overtime win Friday in Kimberley. Trevor Van Steinburg scored twice and Jordan Busch, Justin Meler and Jason Richter each had singles to lead Kimberley.Busch, Braden Saretsky, and Richter also finished with two points.The story of the game, and most of the playoffs, was the play between the pipes by goalie Tyson Brouwer.The native of Lethbridge, Alta. stopped 33 of 34 shots in the game to register his 16th win of the playoffs for Kimberley in 20 games.During the playoffs Brouwer had a 1.78 goals against average and a .949 save percentage to finish second to Brock Lefebvre of Columbia Valley.The big difference is Lefebvre played only three games to 20 for Brouwer.Kimberley now represents the KIJHL at upcoming Cyclone Taylor Cup April 3-6 in Mission.The KIJHL is the defending champion after Beaver Valley Nitehawks won the title last year in Nelson.Kimberley opens play Friday against the host Mission City Outlaws.last_img read more

DOWNHILL SPECIALIST VELVET MESQUITE HEADS A FIELD OF 14 IN SATURDAY’S $150,000 SUNSHINE MILLIONS FILLY & MARE TURF AT 6 ½ FURLONGS DOWN CAMINO REAL TURF COURSE

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Jan. 19, 2015) – Stakes winner Velvet Mesquite returns once again to the surface she has clearly excelled over on Saturday. Velvet Mesquite will take on 13 rivals in the Sunshine Millions Cal Cup Day’s edition of the Sunshine Millions Filly and Mare Turf Sprint at 6 ½ furlongs down Santa Anita’s unique hillside turf course.Owned and bred by Harris Farms and trained by Blake Heap, the 5 year-old mare was a strong third in the Gr. II Monrovia down the hillside in her last out Jan. 4. A staggering five for seven when running over the course, Velvet Mesquite will seek her second stakes win Saturday. By In Excess out of the Huddle Up mare Mesquite, Velvet Mesquite is 11-5-2-1 overall with earnings of $284,606.A hillside professional in her own right, Carla Gaines’ Heat Trap comes off a second place finish in the Gr. II Monrovia. Owned and bred by Mark Devereaux and Scott Gross, the 6- year-old will break from the far outside with regular rider Victor Espinoza in an attempt to win her first-ever stakes race.By Unusual Heat, Heat Trap has two wins, two seconds and a third from five tries down the hill. She is 12-4-5-1- overall with earnings of $291,956.Current leading trainer Jerry Hollendorfer will send out Doinghardtimeagain in only her second-ever attempt down the hill. Owned and bred by Tommy Town Thoroughbreds, LLC, the 5-year-old has run in 15 straight stakes races.In her latest turf try, the mare by Ministers Wild Cat was pulled up and vanned off in the one mile Solana Beach Handicap at Del Mar Aug. 17. Jockey Mike Smith said it was purely precautionary and that “I knew she had a foot issue before and I felt her feet were stinging her so I didn’t want to take any chances.”Third in the 6 ½ furlong Kalookan Queen Dec. 28, Doinghardtimeagain will again be reunited with Elvis Trujillo, who when paired with Hollendorfer has been in the money 55% of the time this meet.The complete field for Saturday’s Sunshine Millions Filly and Mare Turf Sprint Stakes, to be run as the seventh race on a ten-race card, with jockeys and weights in post position order: More Complexity, Mario Gutierrez, 123; Air of Royalty, Edwin Maldonado, 118; Home Journey, Tyler Baze, 120; Velvet Mesquite, Mike Smith, 123; Tribal Gal, Rafael Bejarano, 123; Heavens Stairway, Corey Nakatani, 120; Go West Marie, Gary Stevens, 123; Doinghardtimeagain, Elvis Trujillo, 123; Kathleen Rose, Kent Desormeaux, 118; Shakeitupbetty, Alex Solis, 118; My Monet, Martin Garcia, 120; Marks Mine, Frank Alvarado, 118; Magic Spot, Drayden Van Dyke, 118; Heat Trap, Victor Espinoza, 120.                 There is a specialfirst post time on Saturday of 12:00 p.m. Admission gates open at 10:00 a.m.last_img read more

HEAVILY FAVORED PACIFIC HEAT TAKES $200,000 XPRESSBET CALIFORNIA OAKS BY 5 ¼ LENGTHS; PRAT & EURTON TEAM TO WIN AT ONE MILE TURF 1:35.75

first_img– ARCADIA, Calif. (Jan. 30, 2016)–In her first-ever try on turf, heavily favored Pacific Heat responded with a resounding 5 ¼ length win in Saturday’s $200,000 California Cup Oaks for 3-year-old fillies. Ridden by Flavien Prat and trained by Peter Eurton, the California-bred daughter of Unusual Heat got one mile in 1:35.75.Attentive to the pace throughout, Pacific Heat took command going to the quarter pole and the Oaks was, for all intents and purposes, over.“She was relaxed going down the backside,” said Prat. “But when a horse came up on her outside (Run Like the Boss, with Joe Talamo), she grabbed the bit and was a little bit aggressive after that. I think it was just because she is a ton of horse and she doesn’t know much yet. She’s pretty impressive.”Off at 4-5 in a field of eight, she paid $3.80, $2.80 and $2.20.“The way she was training, it (a dominating performance) wasn’t surprising,” said Eurton. “The biggest question to me was not the turf, but whether she could get two turns and there was no question about that today.”Owned by Alesia, Burns and Ciaglia Racing, LLC, Pacific Heat got her third win from four starts and with the winner’s share of $110,000, increased her earnings to $250,250.Ridden by Rafael Bejarano, Patriotic Diamond put in a good bid around the far turn, but was second best. Off at 4-1, she paid $3.60 and $2.40 while finishing 2 ¼ lengths in front of Eurton’s second entrant, Cheekaboo.Ridden by Mario Gutierrez, Cheekaboo was off at 7-1 and paid $3.40 to show.Fractions on the race were 22.48, 46.77, 1:11.13 and 1:22.28.Pacific Heat was bred in California by Harris Farms and Donald Valpredo.last_img read more

THE CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH BEER & SOUR FESTIVAL RETURNS TO THE GREAT RACE PLACE!

first_imgThe California Gold Rush Festival returns to The Great Race Place for the third year in-a-row Saturday, May 28! California Gold Rush Day at Santa Anita Park will be jam packed with five stakes races all celebrating California bred and sired Thoroughbreds.If you’re not yet a fan of horse racing, and even more so if you are, the Gold Rush Beer and Sour Festival was designed just for you! This trackside event package located along the rail for access to all the live action will feature unique craft brews and sours from the best breweries in California. Plus, the best of the best in local food trucks will also be serving up delicious fare!For $35 you’ll receive Club House admission and entrance into the reserved trackside event area, 10 beer tastings, four sour tastings, a racing program and tip sheet plus, your very own souvenir acrylic Pint glass! Use promo code RUSH16 to get $10 off your ticket when purchasing exclusively online! Additional beer and sour tastings will be available for purchase during the event.Visit santaanita.com/events for more information and to purchase your ticket for Saturday, May 28!last_img read more

O’NEILL & PRAT TEAM WITH AVANTI BELLO FOR 1 ¾ LENGTH WIN IN $100,000 TIZNOW STAKES AS CAL-BRED SON OF INCLUDE GETS FLAT MILE IN 1:35.95

first_imgTIZNOW IS PART OF GOLDEN STATE SERIES FOR CALIFORNIA-BRED OR SIRED HORSES ARCADIA, Calif. (Feb. 26, 2017)–Avanti Bello took a steep drop in class and got back to his preferred distance in taking Sunday’s $100,000 Tiznow Stakes by 1 ¾ lengths under Flavien Prat.   Trained by Doug O’Neill, the 5-year-old horse by Include got a flat mile in 1:35.95.Breaking from the far outside in a field of seven older horses bred or sired in California, Avanti Bello, who was distanced here in the Grade II, 1 1/16 miles San Antonio Stakes on Feb. 4, broke alertly and was well within himself while procuring second position behind pacesetter Acceptance, who he tracked to the top of the lane, from where he took command.“The first part of the race, we didn’t go that fast which is good for (Avanti Bello),” said Prat.  “He doesn’t have a lot of speed the first part, but he needs to be right there at the end.  With not a lot of speed, I didn’t have to rush him.”Owned by Pablo Suarez, Steven Keh, Jim Richardson, Tom Roberts and Wonderland Racing Stables, Avanti Bello, who won last year’s Tiznow, was off at 3-1 and paid $8.00, $4.80 and $3.20.Now five for 11 at a mile, Avanti Bello is now 23-6-3-6 overall and with the winner’s share of $60,000, he increased his earnings to $413,416.“He won this race last year, so he’s a repeat winner,” said Leandro Mora, assistant to O’Neill.  “He shows a lot of heart.  Flavien knows this horse very well.  This horse doesn’t have a huge kick and he knows you have to time it right.  He’s a miler for sure.”Ridden by Tyler Baze, Grazen Sky had two horses beat mid-way around the far turn and rallied for the place, finishing a half length in front of favored Solid Wager.  Off at 6-1, Grazen Sky paid $5.60 and $3.60.Off at 5-2 with Victor Espinoza, Solid Wager never threatened the winner while finishing third, one length in front of Acceptance and paid $2.40 to show.Fractions on the race were 24.12, 47.38, 1:10.87 and 1:23.08.Racing resumes at Santa Anita on Thursday.  First post time for an eight-race card is at 1 p.m.  Admission gates open at 11 a.m.last_img read more