Biden is closing the gap on Trump in Georgia.

first_imgIn Fulton County, a Democratic stronghold and home to most of Atlanta, Mr. Biden narrowed the margin by more than 18,000 votes between 5 p.m. and midnight as the work of processing and tabulating the votes continued. In DeKalb County, also part of the metropolitan region, Mr. Biden narrowed it by an additional 5,000. The next update from Georgia’s secretary of state is scheduled for 10:30 a.m. Thursday.Brad Raffensperger, the Georgia secretary of state, said that as of 10:15 p.m. Wednesday, about 90,735 ballots still needed to be counted. More than a third of them were in Fulton and DeKalb counties. ATLANTA — The presidential race in Georgia appeared headed for a photo finish as former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. steadily gained ground on President Trump. The victor will be awarded 16 electoral votes.Mr. Biden began Wednesday morning approximately 100,000 votes behind Mr. Trump, but as county elections workers around the state continued the laborious tabulation of absentee ballots into Thursday morning, Mr. Trump’s lead narrowed to 23,000 votes, or 0.5 percent. Under Georgia election law, a candidate may request a recount if the margin is 0.5 or less.- Advertisement – Republicans in Georgia were nervously assessing the vote count and promised to file lawsuits in a dozen or more counties aimed at knocking off votes here and there. The first case, filed in Savannah on Wednesday, was an effort to chisel away 53 ballots that Georgia Republicans said had arrived too late to be counted. If the trajectory of Mr. Biden’s gains continued, it appeared he could overtake Mr. Trump in Georgia by the final tally on Thursday. The question was whether additional absentee votes from rural and more Republican areas would offset enough of Mr. Biden’s gains to preserve Mr. Trump’s lead.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

Clark’s Story (VIDEO)

first_img November 15, 2016 By: Liz Roderick, Advocate   SHARE  TWEET Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Clark’s Story (VIDEO) Substance Use Disorder,  The Blog,  Videos On November 2, 2016, Governor Wolf signed legislation to battle Pennsylvania’s heroin and opioid epidemic. This legislation will strengthen the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, restrict the number of pills that can be prescribed to minors or in emergency rooms, establish education curriculum on safe prescribing, and create more locations for the drop-off of prescription drugs. During this press conference, we heard from Liz Roderick who shared her personal story.As we discuss the opioid epidemic, two words we hear constantly now, an epidemic that is taking almost 100 Americans a day, it’s easy to think of it in abstract terms and as something that happens to other people and other families. It is easy to think “that’s horrible” and change the channel or click to another article. No one thinks it’ll happen to their family. Until it does. You’re then thrown into a club you never wanted to join, with hundreds of thousands of other families who are equally shocked, angry and heartbroken.My name is Liz Roderick and I’m here with my father, David, and daughter Penny to personalize this public health emergency and put a face on the important work that we celebrate today. I am honored to be standing here this afternoon, albeit for sad circumstances, and thank the Governor and his staff again for the chance to share this story. Clark Roderick was my brother. This is his picture. The opioid epidemic happened to Clark.Clark was a true Pennsylvania boy. Grew up in Radnor. Went to Valley Forge Military Academy. Went to the University of Pittsburgh. Clark loved and I mean LOVED the Steelers. He was a friend to so many. He loved animals, had an incredible sense of humor and a contagious chuckle that pulled you in. He stood up for the bullied. He loved drinking tea and building fires. His 6’2 build and loving demeanor made him a real gentle giant.When Clark was 25 he was in an accident that severely hurt his back. And so begins a tale that represents the vast majority of these tragedies. He was prescribed powerful painkillers, got hooked and was never the same. The next 6 years was an endless chase for more drugs and higher highs. He was a heroin addict in less than 18 months. Our family rallied together, we attended family counseling sessions on how to best support him, my parents sent him to rehab three times. The periods of sobriety were heaven for everyone and always gave us hope that he’d pull through and that he’d beat his demons. We let him know at every opportunity that we loved him. We did everything we could to help him with the information we had.Ten months ago, on December 16th, my brother texted me late that night asking me to please call him at 6am the next morning so he wouldn’t miss his shuttle to the airport. He was happy and excited to be coming home for Christmas. He was discussing what movies he was going to watch on his layover and what the schedule would be for the holidays.On December 17th my father drove to the Philly airport to get him and he wasn’t on his flight. The nightmare started then and within hours we all got “the call”. I’d always imagined where I’d be when I got it and had prepared for it for six years. I don’t really remember exactly what was said but his landlord had been able to break the door down with the help of the police and they found my brother on the floor of his bedroom with a tourniquet around his arm. There was melted ice-cream on his nightstand. That detail always stands out to me. He died a few hours after sending me that text message and taking a lethal amount of Xanax and Heroin. My 31-year-old baby brother. Dead.How did we get here? How does a child from a loving home with endless resources and love at his fingertips turn to heroin? This drug and this epidemic and this disease (and it IS a disease) does not discriminate. I’m here to tell you that if you haven’t been personally affected by this plague then you will be if we don’t all fight back. If it can happen to Clark it can happen to anyone. He got sick and lost his way and we as a society ultimately failed him because so much is still left unknown about how to best address these thousands and thousands of cases. No one is safe. We need to improve our policies, our laws and our systems and what we’ve seen here today is a step in the right direction. Please continue to support leaders and programs like the ones celebrated today.The statistic is that this takes 100 Americans a day. These are not junkies. These are not bad people. These are the sick friends and family members of all of us who need our help. My parents lost their son. A pain I cannot even begin to fathom. I lost my brother. He did not deserve to die nor did he want to die.My daughter was born 6 weeks after Clark died and she’ll never know her uncle. I brought her here today to be part of this fight so she can begin to know the dangers of addiction and opioids. It makes me sad that she’ll grow up in a world that he’s not in. I’ll take her to his grave and tell her stories. He’s buried in his Steelers jersey at St. Vincent’s, a cemetery that overlooks where the Steelers hold their training camp. There’s a Terrible Towel on his headstone. I know he’d love that.Clark is your neighbor, your parent, your teacher, your son, your daughter, your friend. His lost battle represents so many others who followed almost identical paths. Let us learn from their lives and let their deaths mean something to the generations that follow. 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Ellsworth’s Talor Hamilton sets new school swimming record

first_img Latest Posts Bio Part 1: Invisible, incapacitating concussions are sidelining high school athletes – July 19, 2016 Part 2: When the injury is inside your head, some “don’t get it” – July 26, 2016 EHS names new boys’ soccer coach – July 13, 2016center_img Taylor VorthermsSports Editor at The Ellsworth AmericanTaylor Vortherms covers sports in Hancock County. The St. Louis, Missouri native recently graduated from the Missouri School of Journalism and joined The Ellsworth American in 2013. ELLSWORTH — Talor Hamilton set a new Ellsworth High School record in the 100-meter backstroke at Friday night’s swim meet against George Stevens Academy.At the James Russell Wiggins Down East Family YMCA, Hamilton finished with a time of 53.60 seconds to break the previous record of 53.97 seconds set by Keith Chandler in 2012.“He is a fantastic all-around swimmer,” Ellsworth coach Jim Goodman said of Hamilton. “He is a team leader, a fine scholar and the epitome of the student-athlete.”Last season, Hamilton won two state championships in the 50- and 100-meter freestyle. He also was selected as the boys’ Maine State Class B Swimmer of the Year.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder text“He’s a fine example of determination, sportsmanship, teamwork and mentorship others emulate,” Goodman said. “He is only getting faster and better in his sport.”Goodman said Hamilton, a junior, has already qualified for States in every stroke but one, which Goodman expects he will qualify for on Saturday when Ellsworth and GSA compete at Washington Academy in Machias.Goodman also noted that he expects other Ellsworth swimmers, including Cooper Holmes and Sam Alvarado, to break records this season.“Talor is one of several on the team who make up a dedicated and eager group of super swimmers,” Goodman said. “I am pleased to have him, plus all my swimmers on the team.”The Ellsworth boys beat GSA 96-35, and the GSA girls beat Ellsworth 104-56.For the boys, Ellsworth took first in all 11 events:200-yard medley relay: Hamilton, Cooper Holmes, Sam Alvarado and Brian Whalley, 1:48.26200-yard freestyle: Alvarado, 1:54.68200-yard IM: Holmes, 2:06.3650-yard freestyle: Austin Baron, 25.18100-yard butterfly: Holmes, 56.18100-yard freestyle: Whalley, 1:00.71500-yard freestyle: Hamilton, 5:07.37200-yard freestyle relay: Whalley, Valter Moller, Jack McKechnie and Baron, 1:52.17100-yard backstroke: Hamilton, 53.60100-yard breaststroke: Hayden Sattler, 1:05.90400-yard freestyle relay: Holmes, Alvarado, Sattler and Hamilton, 3:34.62.For the girls, GSA won all but two events. Winners included:200-yard medley relay: GSA’s Emma Larson-Whittaker, Maya Pelletier, Ava Sealander and Karina Steenberg, 2:15.30200-yard freestyle: GSA’s Pelletier, 2:20.00200-yard IM: GSA’s Sealander, 2:24.4650-yard freestyle: GSA’s Ellie Gellerson, 31.68100-yard butterfly: GSA’s Sealander, 1:04.52100-yard freestyle: GSA’s Larson-Whittaker, 1:05.88500-yard freestyle: GSA’s Pelletier, 6:14.73200-yard freestyle relay: GSA’s Cedar Slagle, Montana VanDuijn, Gellerson and Steenberg, 2:12.82100-yard backstroke: Ellsworth’s Leah Stevens, 1:22.36100-yard breaststroke: Ellsworth’s Katie Walton; 1:30.39400-yard freestyle relay: GSA’s Sealander, Pelletier, Larson-Whittaker and VanDuijn, 4:28.39. Latest posts by Taylor Vortherms (see all)last_img read more

Why was the President missing from the oil & gas summit

first_imgDear Editor,I watched the news reports pertaining to the recently-held oil and gas summit at the Marriott Hotel last week and could not help but notice the absence of our Head of State, President David Granger. I read the ideas and concerns coming out of the discussions and searched to read what our President had to say about the event. I later learnt that President Granger never made the event.I thought this was strange that at our first-ever oil and gas summit dealing directly with this new wealthy, nation-changing industry, the leader of our country was nowhere to be seen. I am very surprised that the President did not attend the event. In fact, I would like to know why President Granger did not attend the summit. I would hate to think that the President allowed someone to give him such poor advice or even worse, he chose on his own not to go, at a time when Guyana is making baby steps toward this new and intriguing shift.Mr President, why did you, the face of Guyana’s leadership, not attend the oil and gas summit?Sincerely,Winston Marslast_img read more