Fletcher Allen Health Care Names Interim COO

first_imgFletcher Allen Health Care announced that it has named John K. Evans as interim chief operating officer.Evans, 47, a 1977 graduate of the University of Vermont, brings 25 years of health care administration experience to Fletcher Allen having held a series of executive level positions at hospitals in the Connecticut area over the last 15 years and having spent 10 years in health care administration in the U.S. Army medical department.In his role at Fletcher Allen, Evans will be responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of the organization and will report directly to Edwin Colodny, interim chief executive officer. He is scheduled to begin work on January 13.”I am delighted that we have been able to bring John Evans to Fletcher Allen,” said Ed Colodny. “John is an experienced health care administrator with strong ties to Vermont. He has extensive experience coordinating the operations of large hospitals in support of patient care.””I am looking forward to working closely with the physicians, nurses and staff at Fletcher Allen,” Evans said. “My style is to get out on the floors and use hands-on leadership as a way of improving systems and effecting positive change in the organization. I believe it’s the best approach to understanding the issues faced by those who provide the care.”Evans served as the senior vice president of medical center operations at St. Vincent’s Medical Center in Bridgeport, CT, from 1996 to 2001, and as executive vice president/chief operating officer at St. Joseph Medical Center in Stamford from 1993 to 1996. St. Vincent’s is a 410-bed tertiary level acute care teaching hospital of the Ascension Health System and an affiliate of Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. St. Joseph is a 260-bed community teaching hospital that was purchased by St. Vincent’s and Stamford Health System as part of a new strategic alliance. Evans also served as vice president of Ambulatory Services at St. Joseph from 1987-89.In addition to his hospital experience, Evans’ background also includes having served as president and chief executive officer of a start-up, for-profit diversified healthcare services company in Bridgeport named NovaMed Corporation (1989-93). He also helped launch an innovative health care technology initiative named Strategic Solutions in 2002. Strategic Solutions is a division of Siemens Medical Solutions, which is a subsidiary of Siemens, a global company with $90 billion in revenues.He attended the University of Vermont earning a bachelor of arts degree in Political Science in 1977. After graduating from UVM, Evans began his medical career in the U.S. Army medical department where he held various health care executive positions for a period of 10 years. While in the Army, he earned his master’s in health administration from Baylor University in Waco, Texas in 1985.As part of his graduate experience, he completed a year-long residency in health care administration, rotating through all clinical areas of Brooke Army Medical Center. At the end of this residency, Evans was the recipient of the Texas Hospital Association’s “Young Administrator” award.Evans is a fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives and is a founding member of the Healthcare Change Institute, a think tank formed at Harvard University and The Brigham and Women’s Hospital, dedicated to advancing the knowledge and skills of healthcare leaders charged with implementing change.last_img read more

COVID-19 Finances: Binghamton financial advisor stresses preparing for the worst while hoping for the best

first_img(WBNG) — While the talk of the town may be the beginning of the reopening process, one Binghamton financial advisor is urging everyone to proceed with caution. Sydlansky stresses that many lenders understand the current situation and will be willing to work with borrowers to adjust their repayment plan. He says believe it or not, you and your lender actually have a common goal. Sydlansky says that since the crisis has meant people are staying at home more many are saving money on things like gas, trips to restaurants, and recreational activities. He says this is not only an opportunity to save money but to take a look at where you can make cuts. If you do end up with an excess amount of cash because you’re spending less money during the crisis, Sydlansky says resist the urge to spend or invest it. With recent talk of a possible second wave of the virus, Sydlansky says the best thing you can do to prepare for the remainder of the crisis is to create and maintain an emergency account. He says the goal should be to have funds to cover three to six months of expenses. If you are unable to set aside that extra cash and find yourself struggling due to the crisis, he says to take a look at ways to reduce your biggest expenses such as car payments, mortgage bills and student loans. “Refill your emergency account. there could be a second wave and we could be doing this all over again in three or four months where the service industry is shut down so I would say prepare for this to happen again,” he says. “Start with something even if it’s 5, 10, 20, dollars out of a paycheck, you’ve got to start somewhere” he says. “Once you get into the habit it will be a lot easier to keep that going.” “I would encourage people to see where their spending has been the last month or two and say ‘wow I’ve been without that cup of coffee and I’ve been without that trip to the movies if I needed to I can cut back on this.'” “You want to learn from a situation like this if you weren’t prepared this time learn what you can do differently in the future,” said Paul Sydlansky of Lake Road Advisors. “Reach out to some of your lenders and see if you can negotiate, see if you can get rates lowered and see if you can get payments skipped,” he says. “Ultimately they’re going to want to work with you to help you out in the short term because they don’t want you to default on that loan or have problems in the long term.”last_img read more

The banks can still rock a stable market

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