Are You a Cover Junkie

first_imgWhat sets Coverjunkie apart from other cover sites is both the quantity of posts, and the fact that it’s well-organized and highly searchable. Biemans collects covers by publication, theme (9/11, split-run, premier issues), and art director, and he also publishes complete credit information, a rarity. His tastes are very egalitarian; there’s a healthy mix of consumer, mass market, enthusiast, trade, city and regional, and altweekly covers, with selections from Italy, England, Germany, Russian, and of course, The Netherlands. He also has a strong social media presence on Tumblr, Twitter, and Facebook, which helps spread the Coverjunkie cover selects fast and far.Coverjunkie is a one-person labor of love for Biemans, but it’s a project that is helping to redefine the essence of how magazines design and promote their covers. In a recent interview, Biemans gave the lowdown on how he puts the site together, and what makes a good Coverjunkie cover.Why did you start Coverjunkie?Biemans: I wanted to celebrate creativity in magazine design, to spread the love for ace cover design. And it was also a response to the “print is dead” statement, which I think is a lot of rubbish! I think a cover is more than just about selling itself, it’s also a reflection of our visual culture. On Coverjunkie you can see this reflection from all around the world, as well as from different decades.

How do you find the covers you post?

Biemans: I browse the good old newsstand and look online and on Twitter. Right now I get 10-15 covers a day by email, some good, some bad. The best thing about Coverjunkie is that some mags send me hard copies. I love that; it gives me a fab feeling. 

How do you select what goes on Coverjunkie?Biemans: Posting everything would be impossible; I get too many covers sent to me. I post the most creative ones, the remarkable ones, the covers that stand out. The hardest part about Coverjunkie is editing the covers and then telling art directors that their covers are not creative enough, and that I can’t post them. I try to email everyone to explain. I hate disappointing people because I know they’re trying to create sweet stuff. But again, I have to be rigorous; when there are weak covers on the website it loses its strength. 

What makes a good magazine cover?Biemans: It’s the creativity that counts. My motto on the site is “covers that smack you in the face or that you want to lick!” I think the ace cover contains news, a vibe, and creativity. Most of the covers have only two out of three of these ingredients. But when it carries three out of three you have an epic one. For many magazines, newsstand used to be the big indicator, but it’s increasingly not that important, at least not in the U.S. I think a cover these days is more about making a statement instead of selling. It’s about creating a vibe that the reader likes (or maybe dislikes). A magazine cover is part of a brand, a very important part because it has a soul and it can give feeling and depth to a brand.What magazines do you think consistently do the most interesting or memorable covers?

Biemans: I definitely prefer magazines that use a different approach with each cover, who use their cover design to make a statement or to spark and surprise their readers. I like The New Yorker when they put newsy items on their covers. And I think The New York Times Magazine and New York rock it hard. Bloomberg Businessweek, they’re crazy, and what I like about them is that creative director Richard Turley and his team take charge and are very brave. I love all the altweeklies from the U.S., like SF Weekly and San Antonio Current! They don’t have big budgets but they create extraordinary stuff. There’s Spanish Metropoli, Texas Monthly, Vice, IL from Italy, Wired from the U.S., UK and Italy, Suddeutsche Zeitung Magazin from Germany….What advice do you have for editors, art directors and others to create great magazine covers?

Biemans: Three things: guts, guts, and guts. Mix that with talented designers with soul and a fab editor to create the best headlines. I’m a strong believer that creativity brings great pleasure to readers, whether it’s on an iPad, website, magazine or even cellphone. I don’t care as long as it’s well-designed and made with soul. Days before last week’s debut of The New Republic’s redesign, its new cover was posted and circulating around the web. The buzz was on, and people were tweeting and commenting on it before the magazine itself was even available for viewing. Today, every editor and art director thinks about creating a magazine cover that can go viral, that will work at multiple sizes on a wide variety of displays and platforms and create hype. Along with this, websites like Coverjunkie, NASCAPAS, and others are now providing a visual forum for magazine covers from all over the world to be displayed and distributed.The Coverjunkie site just celebrated its second anniversary. It was launched in late 2010, the brainchild of Dutch art director Jaap Biemans [pictured below], who has done cover designs for the weekly Intermediair and the glossy, Vanity Fair-like Hollands Diep, before moving over to art direct Volkskrant Magazine, the weekly magazine supplement of a large Dutch newspaper (it’s basically The New York Times Magazine of the Netherlands). Biemans recognized early on that for many publications, the days of covers getting “heat” on the newsstand were a thing of the past. To date he’s posted over 11,500 covers, and Coverjunkie has become a daily must-destination for magazine art directors around the world.Biemans interned at a design firm in NYC in the late 90s, and that New York experience has informed his design and editorial sensibilities. And while Coverjunkie has a definite global reach, he has a big soft spot for very American style-magazine cover design, as well as for the funky, gonzo-style designs of altweekly newspapers like The Village Voice.last_img read more

Hanley Woods Journey to Customer First Explained

first_img So the skeptic might say, that’s terrific, sounds great, but what’s “customer first” really mean?  There was a time, about seven or eight years ago, when B2B media companies were clamoring to position themselves as “digital first.” The idea was that print was old school and declining, while digital represented the future and offered more ways to engage with audiences in more ways—all in real time.Peter Goldstone But in 2017 that sounds like an artificial distinction. Everything’s digital—even print content. Also added was a point person for these mega accounts—someone to represent all the media brands, plus coordinate all marketing-service and data efforts. “You need one big corporate representative for the whole company to manage the relationship,” Goldstone says. “This is where the integration of the company is playing out. A media salesperson couldn’t do this. A lead-gen person couldn’t do it. A marketing-services person couldn’t do it. You need an integrated approach.” “The third stage,” Goldstone says, “was to become customer first. Now we leverage digital and data to really get into the workflow of our customers. Those are the three steps in the transformation of our company.” Since then, Goldstone relates, the company has been through a series of transformations, arriving, finally, at what he thinks is where all future-oriented media companies should be: customer first. Goldstone’s perspective—whether you agree with him or favor a different approach—is a valuable lesson in approach and context for any media executive.  Here’s a synopsis. But as valuable as the Metrostudy data is, says Goldstone, without the HW customer list it’s incomplete. “The database would be a fraction of what it is with just Metrostudy—the media assets make it what is,” he says. “Media gets you much deeper within the firms. The media gives you much more depth and engagement.” In 2012 current CEO Peter Goldstone came back to Hanley Wood. He had been the longtime president there, but spent two intervening years at Government Executive Media (both companies are based in Washington, D.C.). Which leads, says Goldstone, to the customer-first part. If you’re a supplier serving the housing market, all this information is at your fingertips, but Hanley Wood can do more: It can help you sell and help you produce qualified leads. “We don’t participate in just one piece of the funnel activity—like advertising,” Goldstone says. “We can participate in every stage—right through to purchase. We don’t have to stop at advertising, we don’t have to stop at leads. We can actually serve as a call center for our customer.” Metrostudy tracks everything from population movement to demographic changes, plus land availability, absorption rates, sale processes, vacancy rates, and the types of products that are going into new housing properties. It tracks deeds, permits and mortgages—publicly recorded data. Essentially, Metrostudy provides builders with intelligence on where to build and what to build based on population and demographic demand.center_img As this part of the Hanley Wood business reaches major scale, Hanley Wood had to restructure its sales operation. Two years ago, Goldstone says, Hanley Wood had four customers spending in excess of $1 million. This year, there are 12. And there are 100 customers in what the company calls its corporate list, big enough to qualify for central management. The company has a database management product called DataScale, which, among other things, allows marketers to outsource their data operations. “They’re turning to us to manage their databases for them,” Goldstone says. “Why? Because they’ve invested millions in tech, most notably a CRM platform, and sometimes they find that they don’t have the resources to do it well. So they outsource the management of their CRMs to us, and we counsel them on how to leverage their databases for advertising, lead gen and marketing services.” It’s a reflection of the modern world of B2B that companies have forced themselves through various transformations in a compressed time period—all while facing unprecedented new forms of competition and macroeconomic challenges. That’s what happened at Hanley Wood in the first years of the current decade. The epicenter of the Great Recession was financial services—mortgages, specifically—which hit the residential construction market as hard as any sector of the economy. “The progression of Hanley Wood has produced a different go-to-market strategy,” Goldstone says. “In 2012 when I came back, we implanted a full-blown digital-first transformation. In 2013 we bought Metrostudy, and became powered by data, essentially data first,” he says. (Metro Study is a research and business-intelligence company focused on the residential housing market.) What that means practically, according to Goldstone, is that now the company’s most important asset is its database, not its individual brands. Brands offer credibility and access to audiences, and produce content that drives engagement. But the database is the core. Customers can select names across the database, and that—not isolated verticals—is what they want, Goldstone says. “If you want to brand yourself, that’s how you do it. If you want insights, that’s where you find them. And if you want to generate leads, you leverage our database,” he adds. Metrostudy is at the heart of the data operation at HW, Goldstone says, but it’s not nearly the whole thing. “Every quarter we track 95 percent of all the available lots and land people are building new communities on,” he says. “That’s 36,000 existing developments and 11,000 future housing developments.” Goldstone’s response: “This has dramatically transformed our company and our customer interactions. Our content teams have overhauled how they approach their work. Our relationships with marketers are stronger and deeper, as we are now in their work flow. Our own knowledge and insights of our markets is second to none. And we’ve grown by more than $35 million directly as a consequence of being customer-focused, digitally driven and powered by data.”last_img read more

Communal tension in Delhi after vandalism at temple Centre sends in troops

first_imgSecurity has been beefed up at Lal Kuan near Chawri Bazaar to prevent any flare-up.IANSTension gripped Old Delhi’s Chawri Bazaar after a fight over parking a scooter snowballed into a confrontation between Hindus and Muslims on Monday, July 1. The trouble began when 20-year-old Aas Mohammad parked his scooter outside a building, which was objected by Sanjeev Gupta, a resident of the building.Violence broke out and both communities resorted to stone pelting following which a temple was vandalised. Security has been beefed up at Lal Kuan to prevent any flare-up.Shops remained shuttered in Chandni Chowk and Chawri Bazar as several areas in Central and Old Delhi remained tense.”When my husband objected to parking the vehicle near the stall, Mohammad left, but returned with more men who were probably drunk and thrashed him,” said Gupta’s wife Babita. However, a 27-year-old software engineer, identified as Saqib, narrated a different version. Saqib said that Mohammad his other family members went to the police station and filed a case after he was beaten up.A number of videos which were doing the rounds on the internet showed a man allegedly being thrashed by some people. Meanwhile, three separate cases have been filed, according to senior police officers. “One case is based on the statement of the man who tried to park his scooter, the other is of the man who objected to him and the third case is against unknown people for rioting and damaging public property,” reports news agency PTI quoting police.Another individual living in the same area said, “When Mohammad parked his scooter, Gupta asked him to move the vehicle somewhere else or he would set it on fire. A fight then broke out between them. Some people pulled Mohammad inside the building and thrashed him.”Both Mohammad and Gupta, involved in the alleged vandalism, were taken into police custody.However, the matter didn’t resolve after this. “When Mohammad and Gupta were at the police station, some unknown people gathered outside the temple and vandalised it. This led to tension in the area,” Saqib said.The temple priest, Anil Kumar Pandey, said that a mob came to the temple and vandalised it. The two sides reportedly raised slogans, adding fuel to the fire.Taking to Twitter, Deputy Commissioner of Police (Central) Mandeep Singh Randhawa said: “After some altercation & scuffle over a parking issue in Hauz Qazi, tension arose b/w two groups of people from different communities. We have taken legal action & all efforts are being made to pacify feelings & bring about amity. People are requested to help in restoring normalcy (sic).”last_img read more

Aung San Suu Kyi breaks silence on Rohingya crisis

first_img Aung San Suu Kyi breaks silence on Rohingya crisis IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:01/0:27Loaded: 0%0:01Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-0:26?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading … Closecenter_img In an televised address Aung San Suu Kyi condemned all human rights violations in regards to the violent clashes in the Rakhine state that has seen over 400,000 minority Rohingya flee to Bangladesh. The defacto leader had previously been criticised for not speaking out. She stated she did not fear international scrutiny and wanted to find out why the Rohingya were leaving. Suu Kyi said she was committed to the restoration of peace and stability and the rule of law.last_img read more

Taj Mahal tourists injured by marauding monkeys

first_imgIn this file photo taken on 16 December, 2016, macaques monkeys playing next to a tourist in the grounds of a temple in Jaipur in the Indian state of Rajasthan. Photo: AFPIndian officials on Tuesday urged tourists to steer clear of monkeys after two French visitors were attacked by apes while taking selfies at the Taj Mahal.The tourists were left with bloody scratches and bite marks after being chased and set upon by the monkeys as they took photos at India’s most famous attraction.Footage captured on a mobile phone showed scores of monkeys chasing tourists from the legendary monument to love in the city of Agra early Tuesday.Tourist police officer R. V. Panday told AFP the international visitors were given first aid after being attacked.”They were taking selfies in front of the Taj when a group of monkeys attacked them,” Panday said.In this file photo taken on 7 May, 2018, a monkey shouts as it sits in a pond during a hot summer day in Allahabad. Photo: AFPHordes of monkeys roam the vast Taj complex and authorities have struggled to stop them harassing visitors.Panday advised tourists to avoid the monkeys and refrain from feeding them, adding the cheeky primates were known to snatch food and other items from unsuspecting visitors.Last year a tourist was injured after she tried to retrieve her purse from a monkey at the Taj.India has an estimated monkey population of 50 million and roughly 10,000 are believed to roam Agra.They are fed by Hindus who revere the monkey god Hanuman but their numbers are difficult to contain.Nationwide figures are not available but nearly 1,900 people were bitten by monkeys in the capital New Delhi in 2016, government figures show.last_img read more