Panel communicates sexual violence resources

first_imgIn honor of the Gender Relations Center’s (GRC) Sexual Violence Awareness Month, a discussion panel titled “Know Your IX: Resources for Care and Support,” presented information about the options available for those who are victims of sexual violence on Wednesday in the Notre Dame Room of LaFortune Student Center.“The goal of the panel is to show students that after an instance of sexual violence, they have multiple choices and avenues to pursue support, whether that be physical medical care, emotional care, counseling, or spiritual support in terms of talking to someone from campus ministry,” said Regina Gesicki, assistant director of GRC. “They can do those things simultaneously or separate[ly], and there’s a lot of resources on campus and in the community that are ready and waiting and available for students to help them heal from instances of violence.”Among the panelists were members of the GRC, the University Health Center, St. Joseph Regional Medical Center, the Office of Community Standards and NDSP.Melissa Lindley, Deputy Title IX Coordinator, said she wants to ensure Notre Dame is foremost a safe community.“My number one priority is to make sure that were in compliance with the Office of Civil Rights and really, just to make sure that our campus is a healthy, safe place free from discrimination and harassment,” Lindley said.Although students sometimes feel the process of reporting instances of sexual violence is daunting, Lindley said, Notre Dame works very hard to make the process a streamlined one so that the complainant does not have to repeat the story many times.“[The complainants] have a lot of control in the process,” Lindley said. “I think that is one common misperception. Students often feel like the situation is out of their hands … Sometimes they do feel like it is too much [work to complete the process] and after the investigation, they say that they don’t want to move on, and we do try to respect their wishes. The only time when we would have to maybe go against their wishes would be if there is a major threat to campus safety.”Dave Chapman, the associate director and deputy chief of NDSP, addressed the e-mails that are sent out at times of reports of sexual misconduct.“We try to make it as vague as possible because we don’t want the victim to be identified; we just want the community to know that this happened on our campus,” Chapman said.Heather Ryan, assistant director of the Office of Community Standards, said issues of sexual violence are treated very seriously at Notre Dame.“If someone is found responsible for sexual misconduct, specifically non-consensual penetration, they would likely be permanently dismissed,” Ryan said. “We do take it very seriously, as something that is very important and that we have to protect our community.”Sophomore and GRC event facilitator Katie Benz said it is important for students to know that they are not alone.“The GRC is very open to students for not only advice for themselves but for other students as well,” Benz said. “The GRC is very adamant about promoting gender relations on campus, so that everyone feels welcome.”Tags: deputy title IX coordinator, Gender Relations Center, GRC, know your IX, resources for sexual violence, Sexual Violence Awareness Monthlast_img read more

Student group hosts programming to foster student engagement with the Snite

first_imgStop by the Snite Museum of Art this Friday for the “The Professor’s Pick,” sponsored by the Snite Student Programing Committee (Snite SPC) and featuring professor and Irish scholar Diarmuid Ó Giolláin.The free event will run from 1-2:00 p.m. and is one of several events the Snite SPC organizes to foster student engagement with the Snite. Rachel Heisler, the assistant curator of education and academic programs at the Snite, said she recently reformed how Snite has been run to increase its outreach to students.“We’re broadening our reach … you don’t need to know anything about art to be involved,” she said.The Snite SPC is run through the museum and is composed of 20-25 students devoted to helping connect students to the plethora of opportunities the museum has to offer, Heisler said.“We have 90-100% attendance for every meeting,” Heisler said. “The members [of Snite SPC] are creative. They think about how to use space and objects as a way to get people to engage and use them in new ways. They have a passion to connect and bring the museum beyond its role as a museum.”The Snite SPC is composed of students from diverse majors, backgrounds and years, Heisler said. They meet every Tuesday to brainstorm new ways to get students involved or improve past events.Sophomore Marie Latham, one of the two SPC coordinators for the group, has been involved in Snite SPC since her freshman year. As a coordinator, she helps lead weekly meetings and handle logistics of SPC events. In her time in SPC, Latham said she has seen how the committee has successfully increased student engagement with the museum.“The ‘Anyone Can Art: Bob Ross’ event has been our most successful event so far,” she said. “… We gave people free reign of the event and let people design their own experience.”Latham said the “DIY” art event, inspired by painter and television host Bob Ross, recently attracted approximately 300 visitors to Snite in September.Latham and the committee are in the midst of planning “Snite Fright,” the group’s signature and most popular event, she said, scheduled for Oct. 31 — Halloween night. The night’s activities will include screen printing, a Halloween-themed tour and a “mystery-themed game.”Senior Scott Somers, a member of SPC for three years, said he is also excited about the committee and its members.“It helps that the group is so diverse,” he said. “We have a lot of art majors but a wide array of others like physics, business, english and anthropology.”Before becoming an active member of the Snite SPC, Somers said he was not aware of all the opportunities Snite had to offer.“I wanted to learn more about it,” he said. “One thing led to another, and I have been involved ever since. Give the Snite a chance.”Tags: Snite Fright, Snite Museum of Art, Snite Student Programming Committeelast_img read more

Go Red for Women Luncheon Wednesday in Burlington

first_imgThe Sheraton Burlington Hotel and Conference Center will be a sea of red on Wednesday, Feb. 16, as nearly 500 women ‘ and some men ‘ will gather for the fifth annual Go Red for Women Luncheon.‘This is going to be a powerful and life-affirming day,’ said Melinda Moulton, CEO of Main Street Landing and volunteer co-chair of the luncheon.‘We are honored that so many people have worked to put this together, and that so many women are telling us they can’t wait to attend,’ said Mary Powell, CEO of Green Mountain Power and volunteer co-chair of the event. ‘We asked this question at last year’s luncheon, and are still seeking the answer,’ Moulton said. There are two Heart-to-Heart Workshops scheduled from 11 to 11:30 a.m. One is limited to 25 people, with Michelle Hooper from the AHA teaching CPR. Peter Spector, M.D., electrophysiologist with the University of Vermont Medical Group at Fletcher Allen, will present the other workshop, titled ‘Marching without the Beat of a Drummer: The Heart’s Electricity and Atrial Fibrillation.’ At 9:45 a.m., Moulton will moderate a panel discussion entitled ‘Is Work/Life Balance Possible?’ Registration for the Go Red for Women Luncheon begins at 8 a.m. At 9 a.m., Shyla Nelson of The Good Earth Singers will lead the attendees in a session of chanting. The Go Red for Women Luncheon is set for Wednesday, Feb. 16, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center in Burlington. Tickets are $50 each. For information or to purchase tickets, call 802.288.8307, email Joy.Blandford@heart.org(link sends e-mail) or visit heart.org/vermontgoredluncheon. Lauren Maloney of FOX44 and Tara Madison of Star 92.9 are the emcees of the luncheon. Macy’s and Merck are the national sponsors of Go Red for Women. Presenting sponsor of the Go Red for Women Luncheon is Fletcher Allen Health Care. A Picture and A Promise sponsor is NorthCountry Federal Credit Union. Main Street Landing is a local sponsor. Media sponsors are FOX44, Star 92.9 and the Burlington Free Press.About Go Red For WomenGo Red For Women is part of the American Heart Association’s solution to help save women’s lives. With one out of three women still dying from heart disease, we are committed to fighting this No. 1 killer, which is largely preventable. GoRedForWomen.org, a premiere source of information and education, connects millions of women of all ages and gives them tangible resources to turn personal choices into lifesaving actions. We encourage women and the men who love them to embrace the cause. For more information, please visit GoRedForWomen.org or call 1-888-MY-HEART (1-888-694-3278). The movement is nationally sponsored by Macy’s and Merck & Co., Inc.# At noon, the luncheon program begins, hosted by Lauren Maloney of FOX44 and Tara Madison of Star 92.9. Melinda Estes, M.D., president and CEO of Fletcher Allen Health Care, is the keynote speaker. Shelburne resident Michelle Johnston, who suffered sudden cardiac death on Oct. 27, 2009, at the age of 38, will share her story. Jenni Johnson and the Junketeers will wrap up the day with music guaranteed to get everyone up and dancing.last_img read more

Legendary Oakland Raiders owner, SU alumnus Davis passes away at age 82

first_imgAl Davis, member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, owner of the Oakland Raiders and a 1950 graduate of Syracuse University, died Saturday. He was 82. The Raiders said he died at his home in Oakland, Calif. The cause of death was not immediately disclosed. Before Davis made his legacy in helping shape pro football as the outspoken owner of the Raiders, he played junior varsity football, basketball and baseball at SU while pursuing an English degree. Throughout the years, Davis was a quiet supporter of Syracuse football. He donated money for new locker facilities for SU athletes, according to a 1992 article in The Post-Standard. ‘We have lost a Syracuse legend and pioneer with the passing of Al Davis. We are all deeply saddened,’ SU Athletics Director Daryl Gross said in a statement. ‘His impact on the NFL is unmatched and was obvious. His standard for excellence has been copied by many. We will miss his communication with us and his love for Syracuse. We will memorialize his legacy, as he will never be forgotten in the Syracuse community.’ Davis’ passion for football was evident at Syracuse when he went to varsity practices and spent every Saturday at the top of Hendricks Hill watching the team play in Archbold Stadium. Davis took notes on each play the Orangemen ran and then compared them to head coach Ben Schwartzwalder’s after the game.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text It served as an introduction to coaching in football for Davis, who would go on to coach at a variety of college programs and professional franchises before finally landing in Oakland as the head coach and general manager of the Raiders in 1963. In 48 years as a coach, general manager and owner of the Raiders, Davis led the franchise to 28 winnings seasons and three Super Bowls in the 1970s and 1980s. He built the Raiders into a winner, stressing his famous mottos ‘Commitment to Excellence’ and ‘Just win, baby!’ ‘The Oakland Raiders are deeply saddened by the passing of Al Davis,’ the team said in a statement Saturday. ‘Al Davis was unique — a maverick, a giant among giants, a true legend among legends, the brightest star among stars, a hero, a mentor, a friend.’ In addition to leading the Raiders to success, Davis served as the commissioner of the American Football League in 1966 and played a key role in the NFL-AFL merger. He aggressively pursued NFL players to jump to the AFL, which helped the leagues combine in 1970 to form the modern-day NFL. ‘Al Davis’s passion for football and his influence on the game were extraordinary. He defined the Raiders and contributed to pro football at every level,’ NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said in a statement. ‘The respect he commanded was evident in the way that people listened carefully every time he spoke. He is a true legend of the game whose impact and legacy will forever be part of the NFL.’ After graduating from SU, Davis landed his first coaching job as the offensive line coach at Adelphi College in 1950. Davis would later work as an assistant coach for the Baltimore Colts and as the offensive line coach at The Citadel for two seasons and at Southern California for three seasons. In 1960, Davis returned to professional football, this time as offensive end coach for the Los Angeles Chargers, a new AFL franchise. After three seasons with the Chargers, Davis became the youngest head coach and general manager in professional football when the Raiders hired him at age 33. It was the start of a legendary career as the leader of the Raiders that culminated in Davis’ induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1992. Though Davis will be largely known as the face of the Raiders, he will be remembered as a classmate and friend by those who attended SU with him. Gordon Hensley, a 1951 SU graduate who played football, was good friends with Davis during their college years. Hensley knew Davis before his rise to fame as a fearless owner, and he saw a different side of him. ‘As tough as he seemed on the outside, which I think was on purpose, he was just a very nice individual on the inside, very charitable and very caring,’ Hensley said Sunday. ‘So I think that was Al as far as I’m concerned.’ rjgery@syr.edu Published on October 9, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Ryne: rjgery@syr.edu Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more