A journey…of action

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr “I wonder what kind of tell we’ve fallen into?” – Samwise Gamgee from Lord of the RingsI love the Lord of the Rings, what a great story! A story about good and evil, a story about a struggle, a story about something lost, a story about courage, loss, pain, suffering, triumph, brotherhood, romance, battle, fear, friendship, risk and joy.A story rooted in the human condition. A story of heart where the end is never achieved fully because even after the glorious triumph…the story continues.In previous blogs, I have talked about the kind of story we are telling with our own lives. On older man in my life asked me recently “I wonder if someone followed you around with a movie camera, what kind of story would that tell?”I like the question because it helps me root out my true desires. Desires for my career, desires for our business, and desires for my life. What kind of marriage do I want? What kind of relationship do I want with my children? What kind of mark do I want to leave on this earth? continue reading »last_img read more

Porlier looks to contribute early as a freshman

first_imgOne of the new faces on this year’s Syracuse team is Maria, Quebec native Laurence Porlier.A freshman forward on this year’s squad, Porlier played all four years of her high school career at Brewster Academy, a U.S. preparatory school in Wolfeboro, N.H. She played three of those years for Team Quebec, one of Canada’s premier national women’s under-18 teams. Both experiences gave her a leg up on the competition to help ease her transition into the SU style of play.“The play is a lot faster,” Porlier said. “There are a lot of more players on the team, so there’s a lot of competition. It’s pretty different from high school.”She said she’s adjusted well to the faster pace and the coaching style. Both are much easier than she expected, and she’s been very comfortable working with head coach Paul Flanagan.Porlier said playing just one tournament a year with Team Quebec was both exciting and challenging because it was hard to connect with the girls she was playing with in such a short time.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textNow on Syracuse, Porlier said that she gets along well with her teammates.“I love them,” Porlier said. “They’re all friends of mine and there’re no (cliques). We have a lot of fun and they’re funny.”Despite the tribulations of being a part of a Division I program, fellow forward Margot Scharfe said, the team does its best to remain close and supportive of each other.“We have a big team, so sometimes it’s hard to keep the social cohesion,” Scharfe said. “But we definitely are a really close team this year.”She went on to say that Porlier has adjusted well, as the other freshmen have, to playing for Flanagan’s team.Scharfe, a senior, has been through the ropes and knows that adjustment can be hard. With that, she is particularly impressed with SU’s newest skaters.“It’s awesome to see the freshmen grow because we were all there at one point,” Scharfe said, “so we know it’s a tough transition, but I think they’re all making the transition pretty smoothly.”As far as this season goes, the co-captain sees Porlier making a solid contribution.Scharfe said that Porlier has a big body, so she’ll be able to play physically, be a force around the other team’s net and make her mark on offense and defense.Flanagan agreed. He believes Porlier has a lot of potential coming into the season.“One of the reasons we looked at her during recruiting is she has good size,” Flanagan said. “She’s a good offensive player.”Games are not nearly as rough as in the men’s leagues Porlier played in, but they’re not that far off.“In women’s hockey, there’re not a lot of 5-4 games, there are a lot of 2-1 games,” Flanagan said. “I see her really helping our offensive game and giving us depth.”For Porlier, having the coaches’ and players’ confidences is certainly a great start.Although she’s just a freshman, her experience with Brewster and Team Quebec sets her apart. Playing at a high level isn’t new to her, so her goals for the season are simple.Said Porlier: “Perform as much as I can and every game give 100 percent and play hard all the time.” Comments Published on October 21, 2013 at 10:04 pm Contact Claudia: [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Learning Plaza future uncertain

first_imgPALMDALE – Palmdale Learning Plaza parents are expected to show up in force at a school board hearing Tuesday to discuss a proposed plan to change attendance boundaries districtwide to balance enrollment among campuses. Plaza parents are opposed to one option that would change the school from a school of choice, which draws students from throughout the district, to one that has boundaries. “Our concern is about having our school decimated or eliminated. The programs that we believe are an integral part of our children’s success are being directly threatened,” said parent Tom Lackey, a Palmdale city councilman and former member of the Palmdale School District board. “We feel there are other choices out there. Even though they would not be as easy to do, the pain that it would cause (to set boundaries) would be worth what they would preserve.” Changing the Palmdale Learning Plaza to a neighborhood school would affect about 900 of its students, school officials said. “We have overcrowding at Golden Poppy. Its enrollment has increased by 221 over a one-year period. That’s almost eight classrooms,” said Al Tsai, director of maintenance and operations. This year, the cafeteria stage and a band room are being used for classrooms at Golden Poppy, whose growth is being fueled by housing construction on Palmdale’s east side. Tsai said similar growth will be occurring in the central and western parts of the district where housing tracts are springing up. “We are trying to take a proactive approach to prevent what we did all this year for Golden Poppy,” Tsai said of the district’s proposed rezoning. “Instead of reacting, we are trying to reduce populations in schools in areas that we knew would be growing.” The last time the district made wholesale changes to attendance zones was in 2002-03, when it switched from a year-round to a traditional calendar. District officials intended to revise the boundaries two years ago, when three schools opened, but delayed the changes when enrollment leveled off. Golden Poppy, a K-8 campus, opened in 2004 near 60th Street East and Avenue R. It has more than 900 students, about 200 more than expected, because of housing development nearby. New students in seventh and eighth grades are being sent to Shadow Hills Intermediate, about a mile away. At Juniper Intermediate, enrollment has shrunk for two straight years. The district had expected more than 1,000 students this year, but just 900 enrolled. Yucca School has 750 students, compared with projections of 900. [email protected] (661) 267-5744 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! About 40 Plaza parents showed up at the board meeting last month to protest the recommendation. At last week’s meeting, nearly 100 attended, many of them holding signs outside before the meeting started. The 920-student school is now a kindergarten-through-eighth-grade campus that offers a program that ties into the academically rigorous International Baccalaureate program at local high schools, with a strong emphasis on the performing arts. The school moved into its new $22 million campus at Division Street and Rayburn Road in September 2005 after having been housed in portable buildings at different schools for about 14 years. The district announced in February it wanted to redraw attendance boundaries to balance enrollment among campuses. Some schools, such as Golden Poppy, are jam-packed with children, while classrooms sit empty at Juniper Intermediate and Yucca schools, in areas where student populations have been declining. last_img read more