Jarin says Bulldogs need to ‘get up, play together’ amid 1-5 start

first_imgIn the Bulldogs’ four other defeats, they lost by five to Adamson University, 63-58, four against De La Salle, 80-76, five against Far Eastern University, 73-68.Their lone victory is a 75-70 win over University of Santo Tomas.Jarin said they can’t afford to feel dejected about themselves and instead just push through with the tasks at hand.“There are a lot of things to be thankful for and we can’t be sorry for ourselves because nobody’s sorry for us,” said Jarin, whose team tied University of the East at the bottom of the standings with a 1-5 card. “I think the results will be in our favor the next time around. This team lost two games by five points, one game by four, and then one game by one, and isn’t that enough experience for these young men to go through?”“We need to get up, there’s nowhere to go but play together and the results will be better.”ADVERTISEMENT The Bulldogs latest blunder was a close 89-88 loss to University of the Philippines Sunday at Smart Araneta Coliseum but Jarin still kept a positive outlook despite the dreary circumstance.“We just have to do this, we can’t put our heads down, and we have to take this as a man,” said Jarin. “We have to continue to be competitive and we can’t do it by ourselves we have to do it together.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissCredit to the Bulldogs, they were only blown out once in the tournament after suffering a brutal 72-46 loss to defending champion Ateneo.Apart from that 26-point beating, the Bulldogs lost by a five-point margin at worst. Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. LATEST STORIES Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title UP holds off NU for share of 4th spot Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crowncenter_img Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal National University has been battered, bruised, and beaten in the UAAP Season 81 men’s basketball tournament but head coach Jamike Jarin told his team to just roll with the punches and get up as a man.ADVERTISEMENT Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college MOST READ View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

Exxon contract contradicts Minister, prohibits impromptu visits – Nandlall

first_img…says Govt has abdicated right to thoroughly inspect operationsFormer Attorney General Anil Nandlall is taking the Government to task for its utterances regarding its right to make impromptu visits to ExxonMobil’s operations, noting that the contract it signed with the oil giant prohibited this.Recently, Natural Resources Minister Raphael Trotman was quoted in sections of the media saying that impromptu visits would still be carried out. Nandlall, in a statement on Monday, however, dismissed this as absurd.“How does Minister Trotman conceive the Government making impromptu visits to the oil operations when the contract expressly and specifically provides that the Minister, through his duly-appointed representative, must give at least seven days’ notice before they can be allowed to observe the petroleum operations conducted by the contractor?” Nandlall questioned.“What this means is that the Government may attempt impromptu visits, but unless that seven days’ notice is given in the manner provided for by the contract, the contractor reserves the right to prevent the Government access to the operations.”Questioning whether the Government meant to disregard its contractual obligations, Nandlall noted that the better thing to do was to acknowledge that they were in a conundrum. He pointed out that the clause restraining Government from inspections – Article Nine – was meant to prevent comprehensive scrutiny.“More significantly, when the clause, which requires the seven days’ notice, is read in conjunction with other related clauses, one gets the clear impression that the collective intent of the contract is to prevent the Government from accessing certain type of data, in respect of the oil operations.“For example, even where the seven days’ notice is given, there are express prohibitions against the Minister interfering with the petroleum operations and there are a whole host of records and reports, which are deemed “confidential” and to which the Minister has no access,” the Attorney-at-Law pointed out.Meanwhile, taking on recent statements from Business Minister Dominic Gaskin whereby he urged Guyanese to not become distracted by the “tiny vocal minority”, Nandlall pointed out that the only persons supporting the contract have been members of the Cabinet.“Apart from Cabinet Ministers, almost every organisation in Guyana and every major commentator are on public record making condignly critical remarks about the contract. The position is no different among the ordinary citizens, including supporters of the Government,” Nandlall said.The contractThe contract was signed in June 2016 between the coalition Government, ExxonMobil and its partners in the Stabroek Block. While the contractor is obligated to maintain and submit all pertinent records, the Government can neither make impromptu visits nor interfere with Exxon’s operations.Article 9e states that “The Minister, through duly-appointed representatives, upon providing the contractor with at least seven days’ notice, shall be entitled to observe petroleum operations conducted by the contractor at his sole cost and expense…”It goes on to say that “in the exercise of such rights under this paragraph the Minister shall not unduly interfere with the contractor’s operations under this agreement”.In Article 15 of the contract, Exxon is exempted from paying Corporation, Excise or Value Added Taxes on its earnings from petroleum. Article 15.4 also provides for the Government itself to pay the company’s Income Tax.To facilitate this, the oil company has to submit tax returns to the Government. Article 32 also stipulates that Government cannot modify the contract or increase any fiscal obligation the company has.This, therefore, puts a cap on the taxes, royalties, duties, fees, or charges outlined in the contract. Government also has to compensate the operator if a change to existing laws causes loss of revenue for the company.According to Article 32.3, “If at any time after the signing of this agreement, there is a change in the laws of Guyana… and such a change has a materially adverse effect on the economic benefits, including those resulting from the fiscal regime provided by this agreement… the Government shall promptly take any and all affirmative actions to restore the lost or impaired economic benefits to contractor, so that contractor receives the same economic benefit under the agreement that it would have received prior to the change in law or its interpretation, application, or implementation.”The contract goes on to say: “The foregoing obligation shall include the obligation to resolve promptly, by whatever means may be necessary, any conflict or anomaly between this agreement and any such new or amended legislation, including by way of exemption, legislation, decree and/or authoritative acts.”last_img read more

Angels, Weaver going slow

first_img“I thought I did everything they told me to,” Weaver said. “I guess I took a little too much time off. Other than that, everything was good.” Brandon Wood finally is getting a chance to take some ground balls at third base, but it might be a little presumptuous to say he can beat out Chone Figgins for the opening day job. The power-hitting shortstop, ranked as the Angels’ No. 1 prospect by Baseball America, will begin fielding drills at third base today. He took ground balls with the middle infielders Wednesday. “If it works out and he can play third base, to have that kind of bat coming up and having a position for him is something that could help us and is something that’s going to be big for our depth,” manager Mike Scioscia said. “We’re not giving up on his ability to play shortstop and I think that’s important.” Wood had 25 home runs last season to give him 66 home runs the last two seasons. Add to that 14 home runs he hit in the Arizona Fall League after the 2005 season. “I think you realize that you don’t have any control over where you play or the changes and the moves that might happen,” Wood said. “The only thing you have control over is how hard you play. I think that’s pretty much what everybody does until you hear something different.” [email protected] (626) 962-8811, Ext. 2731 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! TEMPE, Ariz. – Left-hander Joe Saunders knows exactly what Jered Weaver is going through with shoulder soreness. Like Weaver did after last season, Saunders tried giving his arm a long break one off-season. That was in the winter of 2002 after Saunders’ first professional season. After pitching a full season at Virginia Tech in 2002, Saunders was drafted by the Angels in the first round and finished that summer pitching at Provo, Utah and Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He gave himself 2 months off after the season, and when he resumed throwing he realized he had some muscle atrophy in his shoulder. Instead of trying to rebuild muscle, Saunders tried to pitch through the pain and caused serious damage. He didn’t pitch in 2003 as he rehabbed rotator cuff and labrum damage. center_img It helps explain why the Angels have been so cautious with Weaver at the start of camp. Weaver said Wednesday he underwent strength tests on the shoulder with seven of the nine tests coming back positive. That means there will be more long toss days before he throws his first bullpen session. “There is a series of little things they can do with (your) arms and how to hold it and then put it through the computer and (get) the percentage of how much better the right arm is than the left arm,” Weaver said. “There were two of them what I was like three percent better and they want at least 10 percent better.” Weaver had a long-toss session Wednesday and still says he is on schedule to start the season on time. “They want about five or six bullpens and about three or four starts, so if I stay on schedule and everything keeps going the way it’s going, then I think I should be ready,” he said. As for general manager Bill Stoneman’s assessment Tuesday that Weaver should have done more this winter, Weaver seemed surprised at that critique. last_img read more