Microgrids, renewables should be priorities in Puerto Rico grid rebuild

first_imgMicrogrids, renewables should be priorities in Puerto Rico grid rebuild FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享USA Today:Visitors to Casa Pueblo, a community center in this mountain hamlet, can tour the solar-powered meeting rooms, listen in on the solar-powered radio station or catch a documentary at the solar-powered movie theater. Later, they could lunch at one of Puerto Rico’s first fully solar-powered restaurants just down the street. On an island gripped by energy anxiety, Casa Pueblo is a calming oasis.Hurricane Maria blasted through Puerto Rico on Sept. 20, 2017, battering the island’s outdated power grid and plunging the U.S. commonwealth into darkness for nearly a year. The lack of power has been a major challenge for Puerto Ricans recovering from the storm and was a key factor in widespread fatalities after the hurricane. The death toll from the storm is 2,975, based on estimates from a study by George Washington University researchers.But in Puerto Rico, restoring power has been a slower, much bigger project that entails, in many cases, completely rebuilding what was a fragile system to begin with. Federal officials have spent more than $3 billion to end the longest blackout in U.S. history and return the Puerto Rican power grid to pre-storm conditions. Now comes the long, tough task of improving the system – at a cost of billions of more federal dollars – to avoid future massive blackouts. How the grid is rebuilt will be a key question in Puerto Rico’s recovery from Maria.At the center of the island’s grid rebuild effort is what to do with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, or PREPA, an agency racked by allegations of corruption and $9 billion in debt. Gov. Ricardo Rosselló has proposed privatizing parts of the electrical system, including its oil-powered generation plants. Other suggestions include switching the system to natural gas.But these plans don’t include a clear path to renewable energy sources, leaving the system vulnerable to future storms, said Cathy Kunkel, an analyst with the Cleveland-based Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, who co-wrote a July study on this issue. An improved power grid in Puerto Rico should include “microgrids,” or clusters of customers around the island who could disconnect from the larger system if a storm hits and generate power on their own, she said. That strategy would begin to shift the power grid away from its reliance on oil and toward renewables.Such a massive shift would be difficult, costly and time-consuming but not impossible, Kunkel said. Lawmakers in Hawaii, an archipelago of 1.4 million residents, passed a series of energy bills three years ago directing the state’s utilities to switch to 100 percent renewable energy resources by 2045. “Obviously, doing that tomorrow for the whole island [of Puerto Rico] is not going to happen,” she said. “But it’s smart to prioritize investment in that direction, which is not what the government of Puerto Rico is doing.”More: $3 billion already spent to end longest blackout in U.S. history. Could renewable energy help Puerto Rico?last_img read more

More than 500 participants at the “Stens Open 2015”

first_img(Source: novovrijeme.ba) In memory on the 32nd World Table Tennis Championship STENS (held in Sarajevo, 1973), Table Tennis Club “Stens” organized the 4th International tournament “Stens Open 2015 ‘ in the hall “Ramiz Salčin” in Sarajevo.According to the number and categories of participants, so far this was the largest tournament. More than 500 table tennis players participated on the tournament in categories of younger cadets, sub cadets, cadets, juniors, seniors and veterans from 10 countries.Stefan Kostadinović from Serbia won the 1st place in the category of seniors, the 2nd place went to Edin Konjić (TTC Mladost, Zenica), while Srdjan Miličević (TTC Vogošća) and Edin Gutić (TTC Kreka Tuzla) got the 3rd place.Mateja Magličić from Croatia was the best in the senior competition, right before Ivo Jazbec (Croatia) who won the 2nd place, and Danira Muminović (TTC Stens Euroasfalt, Sarajevo) and Nedžma Mulalić (TTC Željezničar Sarajevo) shared the 3rd place.last_img read more