Ten Canoes

first_imgWhen ten Aboriginal men go off on a fishing trip, it becomes apparent that a young man has taken a fancy to another man’s wife. Her husband starts to tell him a tale: ‘A long, long time ago…a story far before long ago. Before we can remember.’ The black and white film blurs into colour as we embark upon a tale of two brothers’ love for the same woman. As the narrator puts it, it is a tale of ‘too many words, but not enough women’. This conflict over a woman leads to confrontation with another tribe in which a stranger is murdered. The upholding of tribal law, revenge, courage, love, and loss are all invoked in the course of the conflict. The story is simple, and told simply, but with a humour and emotional power that belies its naiveté. The director makes effective use of juxtaposed shots; sweeping panoramas of Northern Australian landscape cut suddenly to a close-up of the swollen belly of a naked young woman. Different languages reinforce this sense of contrast as the narrator speaks in English, but the actors in various local dialects; in fact, this is the first feature-length film in an indigenous Aboriginal language. One hundred and fifty spears, ten canoes, three wives…trouble’ reads the film’s tagline, and when it gets it right the story is just that – funny and affecting. These funny moments are somewhat undermined as the sub-titles often reveal yet another melodramatic and doom-ridden epithet. Also, the director’s attempt to make a film which satisfies both local tastes and a Western cinema-going audience’s proclivities can stall it in platitudes and politically correct snapshots. Its greatest asset is David Gulpilil as its narrator, whose lively and witty voice-overs fully exploit the comic scenes. The film attempts to explore Aboriginal culture and beliefs, where we came from, why we’re here and where we’re going using local tribal people whose first ‘acting’ attempts are spot on. For a patient viewer, the film is a powerful exploration of Australia’s cultural heritage.1 JuneRenoir, Barbican,Key Cities Lucy Karstenlast_img read more

American bakery week proves a success

first_imgThe first National American Sweet Bakery Week (1 to 7 July) was a success, with increased sales and customer engagement.Dawn Foods organised the week with California Raisins as demand for American bakery products continues to rise and to give bakers the channel to maximise sales. Dawn provided free POS material to the first 100 bakers to register and updated its online American recipe collection to inspire bakers during the week.Jacqui Passmore, marketing manager, Dawn Foods, said: “We’ve had a really positive response from UK bakers for our first ever National American Sweet Bakery Week. With the activity having just finished, we’re now going to analyse the performance, but the feedback we’ve received so far has been fantastic.“Bakers have told us that the POS packs we provided brightened up their bakeries and, along with the competition packs and California Raisin samples, encouraged a new wave of customers and a rise in sales of its American-style baked goods across the seven days.“A number of bakers have already told us how much they’re looking forward to joining us again next year and we hope to see as many bakeries as possible taking part in what is sure to be an even bigger and better National American Sweet Bakery Week in 2015.”last_img read more

ROUNDTABLE RELEASES THIRD QUARTER, 2005 RESULTS

first_imgROUNDTABLE RELEASES THIRD QUARTER, 2005CEO ECONOMIC OUTLOOK SURVEY RESULTSSouth Burlington, VT – Results from the Roundtable’s Third Quarter, 2005 CEO Economic Outlook Survey, show that business executives are expecting increases in both sales and capital expenditures over the coming six months, while employment levels will remain virtually unchanged from the previous reporting period.Chris Dutton, President and CEO of Green Mountain Power, is a member of the Vermont Business Roundtable. When asked to comment on his CEO Economic Outlook Survey responses, Dutton said, “The economy is strong in our service area. As we look ahead we expect increased sales. Additionally, the company expects to increase capital spending to make sure that our electric service is reliable, as that is what our customers value the most.”Conducted in the month of July, the Roundtable’s CEO Economic Outlook Survey enjoyed a response rate of 62%. The key findings, which reflect the membership’s outlook for the next six months, include the following details:* 74% of responding CEOs expect an increase in consumer sales, 24% see no change, and 2% anticipate a decrease. [Second Quarter Results: Increase 75%, No Change 23%, Decrease 2%]* 57% expect capital spending to increase in the next six months, 38% see no change, and 5% anticipate a decrease. [Second Quarter Results: Increase 49%, No Change 43%, Decrease 8%]* 49% expect employment to increase, 44% see no change, and 7% anticipate a decrease. [Second Quarter Results: Increase 49%, No Change 42%, Decrease 9%]According to Roundtable President Lisa Ventriss, “The pattern for 2005 projected sales expectations mirrors the experience of 2004. If the pattern continues, we should see the fourth quarter 2005 demonstrate an upswing. A similar optimism exists regarding capital expenditures. Compared to this time last year, respondents are slightly more optimistic. In terms of employment levels, compared to this time last year, our members seem to be more conservative in their staffing projections.”-#-Created in 1987 as a nonprofit, public interest organization, the Vermont Business Roundtable iscomposed of 120 CEOs of Vermont’s top private and nonprofit employers dedicated to making Vermont the best place in America to do business, be educated, and live life. Member businesses employ over 47,000 employees in virtually every county across Vermont.last_img read more

Animal neglect charges filed against owner of alleged Worth County puppy mill

first_imgMANLY — A woman from rural Manly has been charged with 17 counts of animal neglect after over 150 animals were seized from an alleged puppy mill back in November.The charges were filed on Friday in Worth County District Court against 66-year-old Barbara Kavars. Officials seized 154 dogs and four cats from the property. In several visits to the property, a Worth County sheriff’s deputy says he saw kennels covered with feces and mud and visibly skinny dogs with no water and little food.Court records describe overcrowded and filthy conditions at the rural Manly property. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals cared for the animals and called the operation a “puppy mill.”Kavars in January wanted nine dogs and four cats to be returned to her, but Worth County Magistrate Douglas Krull ruled against Kavars, saying the dogs and cats were among those neglected and that they qualified as threatened animals.Animal neglect is a simple misdemeanor, with each charge punishable by up to 30 days in jail and up to a $625 fine.last_img read more