World T20: Yuvraj Singh’s injury puts focus back on Ajinkya Rahane

first_imgAjinkya Rahane is back in focus ahead of India’s semifinal against the West Indies after Yuvraj Singh twisted his ankle in the ICC World T20 match against Australia.Rahane, who is yet to get a game in the tournament, could find himself playing at his home-ground in Mumbai if Yuvraj doesn’t recover fully in time for the last-four game on March 31. (Manish Pandey likely to replace injured Yuvraj Singh in the semifinal )Captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni, speaking after the six-wicket win on Sunday, said he is open to changes in the playing XI if the conditions demand.”I don’t know whether we should make changes but it is possible, depending on the wicket. We have to see Yuvraj’s injury as well. We would definitely like to have a replacement ready if the physio says his injury is bad,” he said.The team management is assessing Yuvraj’s condition. The southpaw, who was dismissed on 21, was in pain after twisting his ankle and had to be attended by the physio in the middle. Rahane should be match ready if the need arises and even before the Australia game, he had an extended session at the nets of the I S Bindra Stadium.Shane Watson, who retired with the Mohali loss, was asked about his former IPL teammate Rahane not finding a place in the XI.”Jinks (Rahane) I think is a very good player. But where do you fit him with the quality of Indian batting line-up? He certainly knows how to score in all conditions,” Watson had said.advertisementlast_img read more

Vets lobby to expand medical cannabis laws to include dogs cats

first_imgOTTAWA — Parliament Hill is going to the dogs today as veterinarians lobby MPs to authorize the use of medical cannabis for critters.The vets are bringing five dogs to the Hill to draw attention to what they see as glaring omissions in the legalized regimes for medical and recreational marijuana.The law does not allow veterinarians to prescribe pot for pets, even though preliminary research suggests it could be beneficial in treating pain, seizures, anxiety and other disorders — much as it is for humans.Moreover, the law requires labels on cannabis products warning they be kept out of reach of children, but there’s no similar warning that they could be harmful to animals.Dr. Sarah Silcox, president of the Canadian Association of Veterinary Cannabinoid Medicine, says her group has been told the omissions were likely “an oversight” that can be considered when the legalized cannabis regime is reviewed in three years.But she wants more urgent action.“For our patients, they age much faster than we do and this really isn’t an issue that can wait for a three-year review,” Silcox said in an interview.Because vets can’t legally prescribe cannabinoids for animals, or even offer advice to pet owners on the most suitable products or dosages, Silcox said some people are taking it upon themselves to administer cannabis to their pets. They’re using products sold for human consumption or unregulated “black market” products marketed for animal use, but about which veterinarians have concerns about “safety and purity.”“Veterinarians are able to prescribe almost any other drug, including things like fentanyl and other opioids and … prescription drugs that contain cannabis derivatives and yet we’re not able to authorize the use of cannabis itself,” Silcox said.The prohibition on veterinary use of cannabinoids has made research into the potential benefits “challenging,” but Silcox said preliminary studies suggest positive benefits for managing pain from arthritis and other conditions, epilepsy, anxiety and general inflammatory conditions.It is particularly useful for treating cats, who are more sensitive than dogs to the other pain medications currently used for animals, she said.Silcox’s group and the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association have lobbied the government to authorize veterinary use of cannabinoids. Silcox said they’ve been told by the policy adviser to Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor that it is not a priority at the moment, but can be considered when the Cannabis Act is reviewed in three years.However, Silcox noted the government is in the process of reviewing cannabis regulations now in preparation for adding edibles and oils to the list of legal products next year. It would take only a “few small changes” to add vets to the medical practitioners authorized to prescribe cannabinoids and to change references to people to patients, covering both the human and animal variety, she said.The Canadian Presslast_img read more