Hundreds of agents go back to ZPG

first_imgHome » News » Hundreds of agents go back to ZPG previous nextProptechHundreds of agents go back to ZPGThe Negotiator3rd August 20170522 Views ZPG, owner of Zoopla and PrimeLocation, reports that over 800 estate agency branches have left Onthemarket (OTM) to re-join ZPG over the past two years.The latest return came from the famous London agent Cluttons, which re-joined Zoopla just weeks after it went into pre-pack administration in May, a legal move that enables a struggling UK business to be bought before going into administration.As part of the overhaul of the business, the 250-year-old company and its six branches in the UK re-joined Zoopla in May and, Zoopla says, gained 100 leads across its office network during the first 24 hours.Ian Odam, Director of Jeanes Holland Burnell, a multi-branch agency based in Somerset, said, “In January 2015 we joined Onthemarket. After two years of supporting the OTM project, we felt unable to sustain our membership with them any longer as we believed we were missing out by not listing our stock with ZPG. In December 2016, we re-listed with ZPG and such has been the response that our offices received as many leads in the first few weeks as we received in the previous 6 months with Onthemarket and is on par with the number we receive from Rightmove.”Mark Goddard, Managing Director of ZPG Property Services said, “Agents are increasingly feeling the pain of spending marketing budgets inefficiently and missing out on the enormous exposure we provide. We welcome back any agent who wishes to enjoy the benefits that most of their competitors do. Our agent partners benefit from the most cost-effective brand exposure and lead generation as well as a wide range of tools that allow them to generate additional revenues.”Prime Location Zoopla ZPG August 3, 2017The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

Galactic Releases Official Statements After Purchasing New Orleans’ Tipitina’s

first_imgEarlier in November, news surfaced that a deal was in the works to sell iconic New Orleans venue Tipitina’s in light of recent lawsuits and financial insecurity, according to a report from local New Orleans news outlet WWL-TV. The reported plans to sell Tipitina’s came as its longtime owner, Roland Von Kurnatowski, faces a number of lawsuits from investors surrounding bounced checks and unpaid debts totaling nearly $3M.Initially, the identity of the venue’s potential buyers and their plans for the space were unclear. Today, Galactic has officially confirmed their purchase of the beloved New Orleans club from Von Kurnatowski and his wife Mary, after recently finalizing the deal.Galactic’s drummer Stanton Moore stated in a press release, “Our goal is to preserve, promote, and protect the future of New Orleans music, culture and heritage via the Tipitina’s venue and brand.”Galatic’s saxophonist Ben Ellman added,We’re so incredibly honored to be part of the team tasked to be the current caretakers of such a historic venue. My connection with the club started way before I was lucky enough to take the stage. My first job in New Orleans was at Tipitina’s as a cook in the (now defunct) kitchen. The importance of respecting what Tips means for musicians and the city of New Orleans is not lost on us. We’re excited for the future of the club and look forward to all the amazing music and good times ahead!Former owner Roland von Kurnatowski also noted,We received multiple attractive offers for Tipitina’s. It was really important to us to ensure that this club, the icon that is Tipitina’s, end up in the right hands. We purchased the club in 1997 and have nurtured it ever since. We’re confident that Galactic is the right fit – that they will cherish Tipitina’s and take it to the next level while protecting all that makes Tips such an authentic American cultural venue.Galactic has a longstanding history with Tipitina’s that dates back to the early 1990s, when the band was called Galactic Prophylactic. Galactic was started by Stanton Moore, Robert Mercurio, Ben Ellman, Jeff Raines, and Rich Vogel, who were students at Tulane and Loyola universities and ended up settling in the Uptown area of New Orleans around Tipitina’s. With their mentor Theryl DeClouet joining the band to assist on lead vocals, Galactic gained popularity around town and quickly started selling out shows at the iconic club. Moore, as well as fellow bandmates, have also had longtime involvement with the Tipitina’s Foundation started by Von Kurnatowski and his wife, Mary, which helps bring and teach music to kids in New Orleans. Tipitina’s Foundation was not part of the sale, and Von Kurnatowski will retain control of the foundation, which he founded.Tipitina’s was originally founded by a group of New Orleans music fans as a performance venue for local musical legend Professor Longhair. It’s named for one of Longhair’s most famous songs, “Tipitina”, which has since become a beloved NOLA standard. Von Kurnatowski bought the venue in 1996, and while he was reportedly unaware of its particular history, he has since been dedicated to preserving its identity.last_img read more

Sharks coach says another Erik Karlsson setback is possible

first_imgSAN JOSE — Ken Campbell of the Hockey News gave it life and Pete DeBoer made sure it got one more spin through the rinse cycle. But Sharks fans are hoping that Erik Karlsson’s return signals the last “time is nigh” reference of the season.Karlsson will suit up for his first game since Feb. 26 when the Sharks close out the regular season with a bout against the Colorado Avalanche at SAP Center on Saturday. DeBoer announced Karlsson’s return by using the phrase that Campbell made indelible when …last_img read more

More Underwater Wonders Revealed

first_imgThese news items will awaken the marine biologist in everyone.In ancient times, people didn’t know much more about sea life than what they dragged up in fishing nets (or what they saw on the way down to Davy Jones’ locker, where dead men tell no tales). Pondering the bones and muscles of fish while eating seafood undoubtedly sparked some curiosity about their form and function. A few took more than a casual interest in studying fish. Wise King Solomon “spoke also of animals and birds and creeping things and fish” (I Kings 4:33). A psalmist included in his list of awesome creations “the sea, great and broad, in which are swarms without number, animals both small and great.” (Psalm 104:25). Sailors told tales about sea monsters. Those living by the sea undoubtedly saw ocean-going mammals like seals or sea lions, and some probably saw dolphins at play. Only a lucky few ever witnessed a whale.Today, we have ships and boats of all kinds, scuba gear, submarines, robotic vehicles, scientific instruments, satellites and detailed maps of ocean currents and the ocean floor. If anyone should be awestruck by sea creatures, it’s us. And yet the sea is still at the frontier of scientific knowledge. Illustra’s film Living Waters featured just a few cases of amazing marine animals: dolphins, sea turtles, salmon and humpback whales. Here, now, are some of the latest findings from marine biologists about life under the water, where the vast majority of animals on the planet live out their complex lives.Which Way Is Up?Salmon eggs in stream, courtesy Illustra Media.Some of the stars of Illustra’s film were Pacific salmon, which migrate from fresh water out to sea, travel thousands of miles, then return. A few scenes, very cute, showed the little hatchlings emerging from their gravel nests or “redds” dug out for them by their mothers. If you picture yourself as a hatchling just beginning independent life after using up your yolk sac, you have a problem: which way is up? It’s not as easy as it might seem. Knowing that hatchlings rise up unerringly day or night, scientists at Oregon State wanted to figure out how the hatchlings know to swim upward as they emerge from the nests for the first time. They know that adult salmon have exquisite magnetic sensing out at sea. Could the tiny hatchlings also be using the earth’s magnetic field?They ran experiments in a lab with controlled lighting and magnetic field generators. Sure enough, the hatchlings could use magnetic information alone, even in pitch darkness, to figure out which way is up.One group of salmon were exposed to the normal magnetic field in Oregon and another group of salmon to an inverted magnetic field. Fish in the normal magnetic field moved significantly further up the tubes than did those that experienced the inverted magnetic field. The team ruled out the possibility that fish were simply startled by the sudden change in electromagnetic conditions by running the same amount of electric current required to invert the magnetic field in the opposite direction.“Given that only inverting the magnetic field influenced fish movement, it seems salmon use the direction of field lines to orient vertically during their emergence from gravel – our findings are difficult to interpret in any other way,” said Nathan Putman, senior scientist at LGL Ecological Research Associates in Bryan, Texas, and co-lead author on the study.What’s required to sense the earth’s magnetic field? Humans can use a compass, but have very little sensation of its presence otherwise. Like the adult fish, these tiny hatchlings can not only sense the field, but determine its intensity and direction enough to figure out which way is up.Invisibility ActCuttlefish can disguise themselves within seconds to look like coral, evading any predator that might come looking for them. How do they do it? Scientists from the Marine Biological Laboratory of the University of Ohio studied the phenomenon in cuttlefish (not fish, but cephalopods related to octopus and squid). They were amazed to watch the animals raise little spikes, called papillae, from their skin and hold them in that position for more than an hour. You can watch it happen in some embedded video clips. The scientists wondered how the cuttlefish were able to lock the papillae in place without spending excess energy, then unlock them later, to resume their smooth-skinned normal appearance. It reminded them of how clams can slam shut at the sight of a predator, and lock shut with a catch mechanism that works against the prying fingers of predators and children.“The catch mechanism allows a bivalve to snap its shell shut and keep it shut, should a predator come along and try to nudge it open,” says corresponding author Trevor Wardill, a research fellow at the University of Cambridge and a former staff scientist at the MBL. Rather than using energy (ATP) to keep the shell shut, the tension is maintained by smooth muscles that fit like a lock-and-key, until a chemical signal (neurotransmitter) releases them. A similar mechanism may be at work in cuttlefish papillae, the scientists found.The story caught the attention of Veronique Greenwood of the New York Times, who calls the cuttlefish the “master of camouflage” and the “chameleons of the sea.” Side-by-side photos show the remarkable difference in appearance with papillae raised (see more photos on Phys.org). For the ultimate disappearing act, the creature can also change its color, and then bend its body to the reef to mimic the shape of coral as well as its texture. Octopuses have been known to do this, too, but “This is the first time anyone has seen anything like this in cuttlefish,” Greenwood says, “a reminder that even much-studied species still have some surprising secrets.”The SurvivorDid you know that some fish can reproduce asexually? The BBC News shows a photo of an Amazon molly, a freshwater fish that can save a lot of trouble by doing away with males and reproducing directly. While this costs less energy, it has the downside of accumulating mutations more rapidly. According to a principle known as Muller’s Ratchet, asexual species should go extinct faster because they lack the mutational sponge of sexual species. “The Amazon molly had been around for half a million generations – far in excess of what theory would suggest,” Jonathan Ball writes. This leads to a conundrum for Darwinism: “Evolutionary theory suggests that species favouring asexual reproduction will rapidly become extinct, as their genomes accumulate deadly mutations over time.” Scientists are not sure how this fish beat the odds.Underwater TroubadoursHumpback whale with calf, courtesy Illustra Media / Dave AndersonIllustra’s film showed a memorable segment about singing humpback whales, but those aren’t the only whale species with a song to sing. Blue whales—the largest animals in the ocean—are talented singers, too, but little has been known about the music of these secretive beasts. National Geographic reported on a 14-year effort by Scripps Institute in California to decode the vocalizations of 100 blue whales. Since the sound travels for miles, they could pick up the sounds remotely with underwater microphones, but they also synced the sounds with individual whales by outfitting them with suction-cup trackers. The results were surprising, changing assumptions about blue whale behavior:The biggest animal to ever live is also the loudest, and it likes to sing at sunset, babble into the night, talk quietly with those nearby, and shout to colleagues 60 miles away.The blue whale, which can grow to 100 feet long and weigh more than a house, is a veritable chatterbox, especially males, vocalizing several different low-frequency sounds. And for years scientists had only the vaguest notion of when and why these giants of the sea make all those sounds.Both sexes vocalize, but only the males ‘sing’, the researchers found. They’re also the loudest. The reasons for all the noise are not well known, but the males seem to begin their “deep melodic songs” around sunset, serenading into the night probably to attract mates. “But no one has ever witnessed blue whale reproduction,” one researcher commented. For all the research effort, scientists are only beginning to decipher this underwater performance.The more details you learn about living things, the less excuse you have to chalk it up to evolution. (Visited 599 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

CANADIAN ACTOR JONATHAN WATTON ON HOW PAUL RYAN INSPIRED HIS HANDMAIDS TALE

first_imgTORONTO — As he prepared to play a cutthroat commander in the new season of “The Handmaid’s Tale,” Jonathan Watton of Corner Brook, N.L., heard from the writers that the character was similar to a certain Republican south of the border.“They said, ‘Look, there’s a particular political person in the States who we’ve thought of and he’s younger, he’s ambitious, politically astute, and in some ways out for himself,’” Watton said in an interview.And who was that person? Jonathan Watton poses for a portrait in Toronto, on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. As he prepared to play a cuttthroat commander in the new season of “The Handmaid’s Tale,” Jonathan Watton of Corner Brook, N.L., heard from the writers that the character was similar to a certain Republican south of the border. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Lahodynskyj Facebook Advertisement “Should I say?” the affable Watton said with a laugh. “Well, they modelled him a little bit after Paul Ryan (the former U.S. House Speaker). Not in terms of necessarily where he comes from but just where he slots into that power structure: Politically astute, intelligent and yet just intensely after a goal. That was helpful for me. It just clarified what his motivations are.”Watton plays American Cmdr. Mathew Calhoun in season 3 of the Emmy-winning dystopian drama, which is shot in Toronto and around southern Ontario. He first appears in episode 3, set to air Sunday, and is in five episodes in total. The series is on Bravo and Crave in Canada.Season 1 was based on Toronto author Margaret Atwood’s 1985 dystopian novel, while the rest of the series created by Bruce Miller explores what happens after the book ends.Calhoun is a new commander in the Republic of Gilead, a theocracy in which women are treated as a property of the state and some are forced to bear children to combat an infertility epidemic.Elisabeth Moss stars as protagonist June (a.k.a. Offred), who continues to defy the power structure along with a resistance movement that stretches into Canada, prompting Calhoun to take a hard line.“He feels the power structure needs to clamp down, that we need to be stronger here, rule with an iron fist and show no mercy,” said Watton, 41.“Anyone who shows any weakness, especially of the more established commanders who we’re starting to look at with questions, like Waterford for example, he thinks they need to step aside and we need to come down hard. He doesn’t think of himself as a bad guy, but he’s definitely in this world a bad guy.”Cmdr. Waterford is played by Joseph Fiennes, while Yvonne Strahovski plays his wife, Serena Joy. The characters have June in their household as a handmaid.“The tagline this year is ‘Blessed be the fight,’” said Watton, noting the season shows the resistance taking different “and maybe unexpected forms.”There’s also “a sense of hope, a sense of agency” for the resistance, he added.“We see June start to make some strong choices and some difficult ones, of where her loyalties lie and what she’s going to do to take down Gilead.”Watton’s previous credits include David Cronenberg’s film “Maps to the Stars,” and the shows “Private Eyes,” “Saving Hope” and “Murdoch Mysteries,” in which he was a series regular as Dr. Darcy Garland.He was a fan of Atwood’s novel and the series before signing on, and was able to get input directly from series writer Yahlin Chang onset, where the cast was “so welcoming.”“The Handmaid’s Tale” has brought his career to a new level, he said, “just because it’s become part of such a conversation critically with the work that goes on in the show, and also culturally it’s just become part of such a conversation that people are having and need to have now.”“There are many instances where sadly we see a lot of parallels between the very things that are going on in the world of the show, and in the world around us, so it’s an honour to be a part of that conversation,” Watton said.“Who would have thought we’d be having conversations about women’s reproductive rights now in 2019? And it’s very much on the table — more than on the table, it’s being stripped away from people in state legislatures across the U.S.”By Victoria Ahearn ~ The Canadian Press Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitterlast_img read more

Lakers Ramon Sessions To Become A Free Agent

Ramon Sessions, acquired to add speed to the Los Angeles Lakers’ backcourt, hardly did that, and now he is forcing the Lakers to commit to him as their point guard of the future.Sessions chose against exercising the final year of his contract to stay with the Lakers next season and will explore the free-agency market, his agent said Tuesday.“Ramon has carefully considered this decision,” said Sessions’ agent, Jared Karnes, in a statement. “He had to make a career decision and ultimately decided to do what was best in providing stability and longevity for him in the NBA, and this could only be achieved through a multi-year contract.”Sessions, 26, was acquired by the Lakers at the trade deadline from Cleveland to replace 37-year-old Derek Fisher, who was moved to Houston.The 6-foot-3, 190-pound point Sessions averaged 12.7 points, 6.2 assists and 3.8 rebounds on 47.9 percent shooting from the field and 48.6 percent shooting on 3-pointers in 23 regular season games with the Lakers. Sessions’ numbers plummeted in the playoffs, however, as he averaged just 6.8 points and 3.0 assists while shooting 35.3 percent in the Western Conference semifinals against Oklahoma City.It was his first trip to the postseason in his five-year career after starting off with cellar-dwelling teams in Milwaukee, Minnesota and Cleveland.Sessions would have made $4.55 million next season had he opted in to the final year remaining on his contract. Free agency begins on July 1st. Steve Blake, who has two years remaining on his deal, paying him $4 million annually, is the only Lakers point guard under contract. read more

Has Kareem Hunt Hit A Wall

After a torrid start to the season, Kansas City Chiefs’ rookie running back Kareem Hunt has had a dreadful handful of games. What happened? Has he hit some kind of “rookie wall?” In the video above, we investigate.